5 doctors weighed in:
Could my baby be at risk of sid is she won't fall asleep lying in her back?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
The risk of sids (sudden infant death syndrome) is greatest in the first 6 months of life, and is significantly increased by putting your baby to sleep on her stomach or side.
Infants should always be put to sleep on their backs. Another factor that increases sids risk is having a smoker in the house. Factors that decrease risk include pacifier use and background noise such as a fan.

In brief: Yes
The risk of sids (sudden infant death syndrome) is greatest in the first 6 months of life, and is significantly increased by putting your baby to sleep on her stomach or side.
Infants should always be put to sleep on their backs. Another factor that increases sids risk is having a smoker in the house. Factors that decrease risk include pacifier use and background noise such as a fan.
Dr. Scott Katz
Dr. Scott Katz
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
Yes, there is a small risk of sids.
Years ago in america, when babies slept on their tummies, about 3 babies out of every 1000 would die of sids. Nowadays, when babies sleep on their backs, about 1 to 1.5 babies per 1000 die of sids. So, the chances of getting sids is worse when sleeping on the tummy. Parents should talk with the doctor if their baby won't sleep on his back.

In brief: Yes
Yes, there is a small risk of sids.
Years ago in america, when babies slept on their tummies, about 3 babies out of every 1000 would die of sids. Nowadays, when babies sleep on their backs, about 1 to 1.5 babies per 1000 die of sids. So, the chances of getting sids is worse when sleeping on the tummy. Parents should talk with the doctor if their baby won't sleep on his back.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Sue Hall
Pediatrics
In brief: Yes
The risk of sids is definitely increased in babies who sleep on their tummies, and slightly less if sleeping on their side.
If baby falls asleep on her tummy, try to turn her over to her back once she is asleep. Make sure her bed doesn't have any pillows, quilts, or other soft bedding in which she could suffocate, in case she falls asleep on her stomach and you don't have a chance to turn her.

In brief: Yes
The risk of sids is definitely increased in babies who sleep on their tummies, and slightly less if sleeping on their side.
If baby falls asleep on her tummy, try to turn her over to her back once she is asleep. Make sure her bed doesn't have any pillows, quilts, or other soft bedding in which she could suffocate, in case she falls asleep on her stomach and you don't have a chance to turn her.
Dr. Sue Hall
Dr. Sue Hall
Thank
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