Mothers mom had pancreatic cancer at 72, dad had colon at 87, she had had lobular breast cancer at 54. I've had brca testing- negative. Am I at risk?

Not extra risk. Keep up surveillance like everybody else, and good luck.
Some risk. There is some risk even though you don't have the BRCA gene mutation. If your own parents, instead of your grandparents, had these diseases your risk would be greater. A geneticist can advise you better,however.

Related Questions

Mother had breast cancer at 54 and grandmother had pancreatic cancer at 70. My insurance won't cover the brca testing. What do I do? It's $4000!

Please discuss . Increased screening tests with your doc like blood work and scans that may be covered and the supeme court just ruled they do not have a monopoloy on that test so in the next few years other companies will most likely be able to offer similar tests and the price will be much cheaper ! Read more...
Test Mom First. Brca testing is reserved for women who are at significant risk for the hereditary type of breast cancer. While it is possible that your mom is brca (+), the odds are less than 10% unless she was under 45 at diagnosis, other family members had breast or ovarian ca, had bilateral-or "triple negative" breast ca, etc. Either way, it is best to test your mom first; if she's (-), no need to be tested. Read more...
Genetic counselor. See a genetic counselor if you haven't already. And don't be too stressed! we already know your risk for breast cancer is higher because of your mom. So start preventive measures including exercise, reduce alcohol (less than 4 drinks a week), keep your weight down, do self breast exams, and remind your doctors about your family history. That's more important than genetic testing for you! Read more...
Exam. I would suggest seeing a surgeon for a breast exam. Get a baseline mammogram at age 35 and then yearly at 40. One could also consider getting a MRI of the breasts the same time you get your first mammogram. Just a consideration. Hope this helps. Read more...

My mom had lobular breast cancer at 54 and her paternal cousin had breast cancer at 48. Everyone is brca negative. Is this likely hereditary?

Hard to tell... ...without more info. BRCA 1 and 2 are not the only genes known to increase the risk for cancer and there are probably others we do not know anything about. Someone in the family (preferably your mom or her cousin) should visit a genetic counselor (if they have not yet done so) to see what other genes need to be tested if necessary and what else they can do to reduce their risk. . Read more...

My mom had lobular breast cancer at 52. Brca negative. Is lobular breast cancer more genetic based than ductal?

No its medullary. a quote from Lancethttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9167459: "The occurrence of invasive lobular carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma was not significantly different between carriers of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and controls. Medullary or atypical medullary carcinoma was, however, found more often in BRCA1 (13%, p . Read more...

My mother had lobular breast cancer at 53. Does this mean ill get it? Is the lobular variety more likely genetic? I'm brca negative.

Probably not, no. The lobular variety has similar genetic risk as other varieties. Your mother having breast cancer does mean you have greater than average risk but it is still much more likely that you won't get it than you will. Many genes besides BRCA affect risk, but diet and lifestyle still has a greater influence on risk than genetics. See http://tinyurl.com/zwgadg2 and http://tinyurl.com/zg66ou7. Read more...

Fam history uterine/colon/prostate/breast cancer on both mom/dad sides. All diagnosed before 50. Am I at an increased risk?

May be. It would require a more detailed history about your family. It would be prudent to consult your doctor to see if you may need genetic testing and also discuss about starting cancer surveillance at an age 10 years younger than the earliest age of relevant cancer in your family. Wish you good health! For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Drink enough water daily so that your urine is mostly colorless. Practice safe sex. Get HPV vaccine. Read more...