Can increased tearing lead to long term vision impairment?

No. The tear mechanism is outside of the working compenents of the eye. Increased tear may lead to the annoyance of constant wiping of the eye and in the worse cases a degree of lid change similar to chapped lips. But the tears protect the eyes; it is the tear deficient who get into visual trouble.
No. The tear mechanism is outside of the working compenents of the eye. Increased tear may lead to the annoyance of constant wiping of the eye and in the worse cases a degree of lid change similar to chapped lips. But the tears protect the eyes; it is the tear deficient who get into visual trouble.
No. However, the tearing could be a symptom of some other condition that could affect vision. One common example is a corneal abrasion. If the tearing is new or associated with other symptoms such as pain, fever or redness of the eye, then the child needs to be examined.
No. Certain disorders that can impair vision can cause increased tearing but increased tearing does not cause visual disturbances.
No. Most babies who appear to have increased tears in the eyes actually have some blockage in the tear ducts (drainage ducts near the bridge of the nose), so the babies' tears just stay visible. A pediatric eye doctor can examine the eyes to be sure there isn't a problem with the eyeball itself, and plan treatment. There should be no effect on vision, if the teariness is just due to blocked ducts.
No. Not usually, but it depends on what is causing the tearing. The most common cause of excessive tearing in a baby is a blocked tear duct (that's the drainage system), which has nothing to do with vision.