I have chronic cholecystits according to a recent hida scan. Will soon have my gallbladder removed. Can my gbd be the cause of my kidney stones?

No relation. Gallstones and kidney stones are formed from different type of materials. You may have an underlying metabolic cause for your kidney stones like hyperparathyroidism increasing calcium levels in your body, but even then that does not cause gallstones. Gallstones are pretty common. See a urologist in consultation for appropriate management of kidney stones. Good luck!
No. Different kinds of stones. But thanks for asking. I'm glad you're taking a proactive approach to your health.

Related Questions

I have mild pain and several small stones in my gall bladder, with a hida scan ejection rate of 71%. Do I still need to have my gallbladder removed?

No... You don't have acute cholecystitis which would warrant having your gallbladder removed. Your symptoms sound mild and perhaps could be debated if caused by the tiny stones in your gallbladder in the first place. There is no risk in waiting, so i suggest not going for surgery unless your symptoms worsen and all other possible causes have been ruled out. Read more...
Yes you need. You do have symptoms even though it is not acute cholecystitis , small stones can move into bile ducts, could cause dangerous bile stone pancreatitis , or bile duct obstruction & jaundice, elective simple gb removal , which is a same day surgery , will prevent the future need less complications . Read more...
Possibly. Depending the rest of your work-up, probably yes. If your evaluation and resultant diagnosis is symptomatic cholelithiasis, you should have cholecystectomy. These links may assist: http://goo.Gl/6iiah and http://goo.Gl/1c7et. Read more...
Probably so. If these pain symptoms are thought to be due to your gallstones, your gallbladder should be removed to prevent complications like choledocholithiasis (stones in main bile ducts), acute cholecystitis and gallstone pancreatitis. A normal hida ejection fraction does not change that. Read more...
Probably. High ejection fraction can cause gb symptoms not dissimilar to when the ejection fraction is low. If you symptoms are associated with eating or eating certain types of food, i think that having your gb removed will help. Read more...

I have chronic kidney stones. I've had my gallbladder removed. I have severe right sided kidney pain on and off for over a month. No stone per KUB, urine clear. Goes away with hydration! What is wrong? My doctor thinks I'm crazy.

See a urologist. You could have a non opaque stone. There are several kinds of stones that do not show up on KUB. Most stones show on CT scan. A urologist should be able to help and to determine if there is a renal cause for your symptoms. Read more...
Stones not calcium. Not all kidney stones show up on xray. You should see a nephrologist or urologist to clarify the problem. Read more...
May be something els. If you are thinking kidney area, a KUB will not show everything. To fully evaluate your persistent severe pain, an abdominal CT scan with contrast may be warranted you are making the assumption your pain is kidney and it may not be. You could have unusual anatomy of the kidney system causing your problem or your pain may be a back problem but hydration would not help here. Get 2nd opinion . Read more...

5 months High absolute neutrophil (8400-1100)&wbc (1100-1400)hida scan 22% Dr suggest gallbladder removed then check CBC if not normal see hemotologist?

Chasing your tail? It seems that the tests r coming before the symptoms. Are u having any symptoms of a gallbladder attack (pain, stool changes, etc.?) A 22% HIDA seems OK, but the images should tell u if the duct is blocked & ur symptoms will tell u if that's a stone. The ANC & WBC r borderline high, which cd be from infection or dehydration or any number of things. If u r truly concerned, c a hematologist b4 surge. Read more...
Cholecystitis. chronic cholecystitis ( gall bladder inflammation) can cause elevated white cell count, when gall bladder inflammation is treated, WBC should go down, if not hematology consult is advisable as suggested by the doctor. Read more...

Is it possible to have abnormal hida scan, but watch diet and live a normal healthy life without having gallbladder removed?

Yes. A radionuclide scan (hida, pipida) is a study of the function and emptying of the gallbladder. We typically think of abnormal results as less than 35 or 40%; however, I have seen many patients with bilary pain with "normal" results as well as patients with abnormal results but essentially no symptoms. The best place for hida is in concert with other tests (blood, u/s, physical exam. Read more...
Yes. If the abnormality is a lower ejection fraction on the cck portion of a hepatobiliary (hida) scan. However, if the abnormality is a failure to fill the gallbladder, the possibility of an impacted stone increases, which can be an urgent situation. See your doctor to determine just what was abnormal about the hepatobiliary scan. Read more...

I have 3-7mm gallstones. Hida scan shows gallbladder function normal at 53%. Will I need gallbladder removed?

Depends. Only if you have having symptoms from your gallbladder, such as abdominal pain or colic. You should definitely discuss it with your doctor. Read more...
Depends. Symptoms and your physical exam with your doc will determine your answer. Stones in gallbladder, dont necessarily determine a treatment plan. If you have fever, vomiting, worsening pain get evaluated right away. Read more...
Not neccesarily. Depends on if you have symptoms ? Read more...

4 weeks post laproscopic gallbladder removal and having moderate pain in my abdomen. Left side upper deeper pain... Pancreatitis? Kidney stones?

Depends. Unless you have a history of prior pancreatitis, it would not likely occur now (4 weeks after surgery). You may have gastritis from narcotic pain medication, constipation, etc, also, the sudden onset of kidney stones would be unlikely as well, unless you have a history of them. Call and see your surgeon for an evaluation. Read more...
Post operative pain. Any persistent post operative pain should be brought to your surgeon's attention. They should consider additional imaging to determine if there is any additional problem. Read more...