Related Questions

How common is vaginal cancer?

Rare. The rate is 1 in 3, 300 people, or 0.03% of the population. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include: history of abnormal pap smear, hpv warts, previous hpv infection, ano-rectal cancer, vaginal intraepithial neoplasia, and multiple sexual partners. Smokers have a harder time fighting hpv infections and thus have higher rates of vaginal cancer. Read more...
Rare. There are fewer than 1000 cases/year in the us. See this site for more info. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0002479/. Read more...

How common is vaginal cancer?

Not very. According to the american cancer society, there are estimated 2680 cases diagnosed in 2012, which is about 1/100 of gynecological malignancies. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Very rare. It is 1/10th as common as cervical cancer. About 1200-1500 cases per year. Read more...

What’s new in vaginal cancer research?

Several things. Scientists are learning more about tumor suppressor genes, refining radiation therapy techniques, and developing new procedures for reconstruction after surgery. Read more...
Not much right now. There are no open protocols through the gog (gynecology oncology group). Researchers are studying the role of hpv in vaginal cancer and it appears that there is some role for chemotherapy but since it is less common than ovarian and cervical cancers there is less research. Read more...

How can you know you have vaginal cancer?

Bleeding/GYN exam. This often presents with no symptoms. The most common symptom is irregular vaginal bleeding, like after intercourse or between periods, or postmenopausal. Other symptoms are pain on urination, pain during intercourse, or pelvic pain. Probably the best way to find out if you have this is by routine gyn exam, pelvic exam, pap smear, colposcopy, etc.. Des exposure predisposes to this cancer. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Your doctor would determine whether or not you have vaginal cancer. It is extremely rare. It can be found at early stages by a pap smear and biopsy. At later stages, it is seen and felt as a mass on pelvic exam. Read more...

What do you recommend for vaginal cancer?

Vaginal cancer. It depends on location and stage. A proximal (vaginal cuff) cancer that is stage i can be treated very well with surgery. Otherwise, chemo radiation is used unless it extends onto the vulva. Read more...

What are the major presenting symptoms of vaginal cancer?

Discharge, mass. Pain, ulcer. Vaginal cancers are less common than cervical cancer. The lesions are likely to manifest by producing bloody discharge, mass and/or ulcer in the vagina, depending on the location, pain. Bleeding on intercourse may be an early sign. Read more...

Can kids get vaginal cancer?

One kind, rarely. There is one rare type of vaginal cancer that is usually seen in young girls. It is called sarcoma botryoides or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and looks like a bunch of grapes that hang out through the opening of the vagina. It can be treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, and sometimes radiation. Read more...
Yes. But the type of cancer that they get in this area is usually different than what adults get. A very rare type of tumor, known as rhabdomyosarcoma, will often occur in this region, but other types of cancer can also happen in this area in young girls. Read more...

Can a 18 year old get vaginal cancer?

Very, very rarely. Vaginal cancer is rare, and usually found in older women (at least over the age of 30!) or uncommonly in very young girls (under the age of 8). Young adult women should think about preventing cervical cancer by getting vaccinated for hpv, and see a healthcare provider if you are have concerns about pain, discharge, lumps or bumps, or other changes in your vagina. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. It is very unlikely for an 18 year old to get cervical or vaginal cancer. Even the precancerous lesions are very unlikely unless you have some sort of immunosuppression (hiv, transplant ...). Read more...