Can Cervical Stenosis without myelopathy progress to Stenosis with myelopathy?

It could. There is a narrowing of your neck canal which is the stenosis. If the narrowing gets worse yes it could cause a myelopathy. This is something you fallow along with your physician, to identify this and then treated as you may need.

Related Questions

F/u question, I'm a competative equestrian rider & Skier, with severe cervical stenosis& myelopathy. How much risk am I putting myself in to continue?

X-games. Good Lord, Roger! Horse riding and skiing, why not do some sky diving along with that. Okay, no joke, you've chosen some really risky sports already and you have bone disease on top of that. I can't give you a number or percentage of your risk but I can truthfully tell you that you're not doing anything to help yourself. Try a low impact sport like swimming or biking. Good luck :) Read more...

Mri findings say acquired spondylolisthesis and cervical spinal stenosis with myelopathy. I am in a great amount of pain. What next?

Go conservative. Conservative pain management is always an option #1. Rec. See an interventional pain management specialist for evaluation and treatment. It is a treatable condition with the right approach and experience. Read more...
See Dr. It is time to see a spine specialist for a thorough evaluation and to discuss your options. Check out spine-health.Com. Good luck. Read more...

What is the risk of having severe cervical spinal stenosis myelopathy? There is almost no CSF around T3/T4. Is this a dangerous concern?

Cervical level. T3/T4 is at the thoracic level, not the cervical level. In order to diagnose cervical spinal myelopathy and MRI of the neck or cervical spine would be helpful. The CSF may be narrow at some levels, but this not always of concern. Why is it narrow? Is something out of place? Was there a spinal fracture at T3/4, or was this an incidental finding? Your answer makes a difference. Read more...

What is the risk of having severe cervical spinal stenosis myelopathy? There is almost no CSF around T3/T4&6 due to narrowing from the disks and steno

Myelopathy. Are you sure it is T3, (liothyronine) 4, 6? Not C3, 4, 6? T refers to thoracic. If there is little CSF around the cord, you already have spinal stenosis. The risk of myelopathy depends on how much CSF is there, what the discs look like. If you have any symptoms of myelopathy, then perhaps the diagnosis is already made. Based on your MRI it sounds as if there is thoracic spinal stenosis, but not myelopath. Read more...
Risk is damage. 2 the cord & hence damage 2 innervation 2 all muscles below this level. If it is progressing slowly U may not B aware that it is occurring, until it becomes pronounced & the changes may not improve with decompression surgery. Don't wait! . Read more...
Increasing neurologi. Compression of the spinal cord can occur due to spinal stenosis. which will often cause pain in the back and or in the legs. This can further progress to muscle weakness, weaker legs and paralysis if not treated in time. You need to see a neurologist or a neurosurgeon to guide you in further managing this problem.. Read more...
It depends. As another doctor pointed out, the "T" designation refers to the thoracic spine and you are indicating you have cervical canal stenosis. Therefore, I wonder if you really mean "C" when you indicate "T". Nonetheless, myelopathy is a clinical syndrome that is frequently due to spinal stenosis at whatever level, but the lack CSF around the spinal cord at a level does NOT necessarily imply myelopathy. Read more...

I have lumbar myelopathy from stenosis also cervical stenosis, my legs and feet cramp up so bad after being on them all day long at night which makes?

Further evaluation. If you have a diagnosis of myelopathy, please consult your health care provider about a therapeutic plan, which could include not only surgical intervention but also other aspects such as physical therapy and other activities such as yoga and pilates which may be helpful to you. Read more...

What can be done for spinal cervical stenosis?

Many things. Depending on the severity, stenosis of the cervical spine can be treated with medications, physical therapy, injections, or surgery. Read more...

What is meant by cervical spinal stenosis?

Narrowing. In its most simple term, stenosis refers to narrowing, while cervical refers to the neck region. So, cervical spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal column in the neck. Read more...
Narrow spine canal. A too narrow canal within the spine in the neck or cervical region leading to spinal cord compression or nerve root compression or both. Read more...