Related Questions

Uterine lining is 9 mm and some fluid. Are these strong signs of uterine cancer?

Not necessarily. Uterine thickening of 9 mm is not bad enough to suspect cancer. Your doctor will guide you further but Cancer is unlikely to be the cause of your Ultrasound reported findings. Read more...

My health care professional said she suspects that I could have uterine cancer. What kind of test will tell for sure?

Endometrial biopsy. A very small tube is inserted through the cervix until it reaces the uterine lining. A syringe attached to the end pulls back and the lining comes into the syringe. The cell are sent to the pathologist for examination for abnormal cells . The procedure is done in the office. Read more...
Uterine Cancer. Uterine cancer is usually found in post menopausal women. Only 5% occur in your age group, often in women who have polycystic ovarian syndrome (pcos), where one has to be concerned with not only uterine disease, but also ovarian tumors. Sometimes an innocent looking polyp can also harbor cancer. The only definitive test is an endometrial biopsy, which you should consider without delay. Read more...
Different options. It depends what you mean by "for sure". An endometrial biopsy will miss a small percentage, especially if a polyp is suspected. A hysteroscopy and biopsy (looking directly into the uterus) has more certainty but is more invasive and uncomfortable and will require some anesthesia. I would question why at your age uterine cancer is such a suspicion. Read more...

How do you test for uterine cancer?

Biopsy. The only sure fire way is biopsy by dilation and curretage. When a uterine cancer is suspected its when there is unusual bleeding spotting that's not expected. Pap smear only checks the cervix. The uterus can be evaluated by an intravaginal ultrasound to look for an abnormality warranting a biopsy. Read more...