1 doctor weighed in:

I randomly feel nauseous and dizzy?

1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Dimitri Novitzky
Surgery - Thoracic

In brief: Nausea AND sizzynes

All seems to point towards the middle ear, or other neurological disorder. you should go to see an ENT specialist, or a neurologist.
Often individuals with balance disorders feel dizzy, faint or light-headed. However, some people have the sensation that they’re floating or going to fall, while still others have confusion or trouble standing and walking. Sometimes balance disorders are accompanied by nausea or vomiting (vertigo). Due to the complexity of balance disorders, a multi-disciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment is often required. Patients may be given a thorough series of highly specialized tests such as video nystagmography (VNG), which tests the inner ear and how the brain utilizes this information to maintain balance. Additionally, exams of inner ear, hearing tests, a review of medications and other assessments are given as needed. Many times, patients can be treated without surgery, but those who do require surgery will have care provided by a team of specialists. Other treatments may involve vestibular rehabilitation, which helps the brain readjust and recalibrate to an injury, dietary changes (especially for patients with Ménière’s disease) and drug therapy which may include anti-emetics to reduce nausea and vomiting.

In brief: Nausea AND sizzynes

All seems to point towards the middle ear, or other neurological disorder. you should go to see an ENT specialist, or a neurologist.
Often individuals with balance disorders feel dizzy, faint or light-headed. However, some people have the sensation that they’re floating or going to fall, while still others have confusion or trouble standing and walking. Sometimes balance disorders are accompanied by nausea or vomiting (vertigo). Due to the complexity of balance disorders, a multi-disciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment is often required. Patients may be given a thorough series of highly specialized tests such as video nystagmography (VNG), which tests the inner ear and how the brain utilizes this information to maintain balance. Additionally, exams of inner ear, hearing tests, a review of medications and other assessments are given as needed. Many times, patients can be treated without surgery, but those who do require surgery will have care provided by a team of specialists. Other treatments may involve vestibular rehabilitation, which helps the brain readjust and recalibrate to an injury, dietary changes (especially for patients with Ménière’s disease) and drug therapy which may include anti-emetics to reduce nausea and vomiting.
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