10 doctors weighed in:

I was told that I was literally asking for cancer if I chose to cheat on my celiac diet. Is that true?

10 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Edmison
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
5 doctors agree

In brief: No

Patients with untreated celiac disease have a 6-fold increased risk of t cell lymphoma compared with treated celiac disease.
Although this increase is significant, it would be inappropriate for your physician to state that you are "asking for cancer.".

In brief: No

Patients with untreated celiac disease have a 6-fold increased risk of t cell lymphoma compared with treated celiac disease.
Although this increase is significant, it would be inappropriate for your physician to state that you are "asking for cancer.".
Dr. John Edmison
Dr. John Edmison
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Dr. Arthur Heller
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Not so

Untreated celiac has an increased risk of bowel lymphoma, and esophageal cancer too.
It also has increased risk for iron deficiency, osteoporosis (brittle bones), osteomalacia (vitamin d deficiency, soft bones), lots of other symptoms, and nonintestinal problems. Cheating on the diet is not a good idea, even without symptoms. Sometimes if you get symptoms you may regret why (lymphoma).

In brief: Not so

Untreated celiac has an increased risk of bowel lymphoma, and esophageal cancer too.
It also has increased risk for iron deficiency, osteoporosis (brittle bones), osteomalacia (vitamin d deficiency, soft bones), lots of other symptoms, and nonintestinal problems. Cheating on the diet is not a good idea, even without symptoms. Sometimes if you get symptoms you may regret why (lymphoma).
Dr. Arthur Heller
Dr. Arthur Heller
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Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Celiac & Cancer

Some malignancies are more common in patients with celiac disease including intestinal and extraintestinal lymphoma and carcinomas of the upper GI .
The magnitude of increased risk is moderate (standardized incidence ratio of 1.3, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 1.5 in one study [61]) and appears to normalize within a few years of gluten withdrawal.

In brief: Celiac & Cancer

Some malignancies are more common in patients with celiac disease including intestinal and extraintestinal lymphoma and carcinomas of the upper GI .
The magnitude of increased risk is moderate (standardized incidence ratio of 1.3, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 1.5 in one study [61]) and appears to normalize within a few years of gluten withdrawal.
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
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Nicole Bressler
Emergency Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

Celiacs is associated with t cell lymphoma cancer & there is a risk of getting if you do not follow a gluten free diet.
With celiacs, your body's immune system will attack & destroy your intestinal cells that absorb your nutrients if you eat gluten. You are also at risk of essential nutrient/vitamin deficiencies if you eat gluten, skin rashes, seizures, depression, arthritis, & more.

In brief: Depends

Celiacs is associated with t cell lymphoma cancer & there is a risk of getting if you do not follow a gluten free diet.
With celiacs, your body's immune system will attack & destroy your intestinal cells that absorb your nutrients if you eat gluten. You are also at risk of essential nutrient/vitamin deficiencies if you eat gluten, skin rashes, seizures, depression, arthritis, & more.
Nicole Bressler
Nicole Bressler
Answer assisted by Nicole Bressler, Medical Student
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