My grandmother had breast cancer and my grandfather passed from sarcoma both before the age of 40 (both dad's side) Would I benefit from BRCA testing?

Yes. Having a second degree relative like a grandmother with breast cancer before the age of 40 is a red flag for possible BRCA. If your grandmother is living then she could be tested. If not, then your mother or father could be tested depending on which side of the family. If they do not have the gene then they cannot pass it on to you. Hope this helps.
Genetic counseling. is recommended before and after any genetic test. This counseling is provided by a doctor who is experienced in cancer genetics.
Probably not. So sorry to hear that. There is a formula that your PCP can go through with you to calculate your risk. Unless your grandmother had an early breast cancer, younger than 40, it probably won't increase your risk of hereditary cancer. 90% of breast cancers are NOT Brca cancers. Typically there is a history of several breast cancers in first degree relatives and early breast cancer.

Related Questions

Mothers mom had pancreatic cancer at 72, dad had colon at 87, she had had lobular breast cancer at 54. I've had brca testing- negative. Am I at risk?

Doubt. With the negative BRCA tests, your risk of these is much lower. They may identify other genetic tumor markers for these as time goes on. Remember, the majority of colon cancer is found in persons without a family history for it. Read more...
Some risk. There is some risk even though you don't have the BRCA gene mutation. If your own parents, instead of your grandparents, had these diseases your risk would be greater. A geneticist can advise you better,however. Read more...
Not extra risk. Keep up surveillance like everybody else, and good luck. Read more...

If negative for brca gene, yet father had prostate cancer, is his daughter still at risk for breast cancer? I heard they were linked.

BRCA gene links. A family history of breast ovarian or colon cancer can predispose future genetic progeny if the BRCA is positive. I am unaware of a negative BRCA link to prostate cancer in males producing breast cancer in the female progeny. Read more...
Not elevated risk. In families who DO have a BRCA mutation, the breast and prostate cancers can be linked. However both are very common cancers, so they can be seen within families even if BRCA negative. The average lifetime risk of breast cancer for any given woman is 12.5%. You can do a search for the Gail Risk Model to get a little better idea of your own personal risk. Read more...

At what age should you be screened for breast cancer or cervical cancer if grandmother and aunt had each at early age in 30s/40s? Brca testing? ;

Screening. The pap smear is the standard screening test for cercival dysplasia/cancer. You should have routine pap smears starting when you first became sexually active. Mammograms are effective screening tools especially as women age, they are not effective for younger women with dense breasts. Speak with a genetic councilor about brca testing. Sounds to me like you should be tested. Read more...
Risk assessment. Cervical cancer is mostly related to hpv virus, you get your paps as any other woman, starting around 21. You should talk to a genetic counselor to get a good family history and probably get tested for brca and other high risk genes. Even if negative, and depending on the circumstances, you may be considered high risk and be a candidate for enhanced screening or risk reduction manipulations. Read more...
Different for each. You've had sex, so you should have yearly pap smears to detect cervical cancer. (this is not related to brca.) if your aunt and grandmother are on the same side of your family, and they both had breast cancer, you may meet criteria for brca testing. Genetic counseling is the next step. You don't need mammograms until 40 (unless you have a mutation), but do breast self-exam monthly! Read more...
See genetics. Early age breast cancer might signal an inherited gene mutation such as the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, for which screening would begin around the age of 25. See a geneticist to assess risk for an inherited cancer syndrome. Cervical cancer screening begins by age 21. Family history may be a sign of shared environmental or lifestyle factors but inherited risk unlikely; tell your GYN the family history. Read more...

Mother had breast cancer at 54 and grandmother had pancreatic cancer at 70. My insurance won't cover the brca testing. What do I do? It's $4000!

Please discuss . Increased screening tests with your doc like blood work and scans that may be covered and the supeme court just ruled they do not have a monopoloy on that test so in the next few years other companies will most likely be able to offer similar tests and the price will be much cheaper ! Read more...
Test Mom First. Brca testing is reserved for women who are at significant risk for the hereditary type of breast cancer. While it is possible that your mom is brca (+), the odds are less than 10% unless she was under 45 at diagnosis, other family members had breast or ovarian ca, had bilateral-or "triple negative" breast ca, etc. Either way, it is best to test your mom first; if she's (-), no need to be tested. Read more...
Genetic counselor. See a genetic counselor if you haven't already. And don't be too stressed! we already know your risk for breast cancer is higher because of your mom. So start preventive measures including exercise, reduce alcohol (less than 4 drinks a week), keep your weight down, do self breast exams, and remind your doctors about your family history. That's more important than genetic testing for you! Read more...
Exam. I would suggest seeing a surgeon for a breast exam. Get a baseline mammogram at age 35 and then yearly at 40. One could also consider getting a MRI of the breasts the same time you get your first mammogram. Just a consideration. Hope this helps. Read more...

How many relatives need to have had breastcancer before you should get genetic testing for the BRCA genes? My mother contracted breast cancer, I am 40

Other factors must . be considered. If your mom had a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, cancer in both breasts, both breast and ovarian cancers, multiple breast cancers or your ethnicity is Ashkenazi Jewish, talk to your GYN about genetic counseling to evaluate your potential risk. Read more...
Usually 2. With some exceptions, the number is two first-degree relatives (mom/sisters), before screening for BRCA. Exceptions include if there is a history of ovarian cancer, pre-menopausal breast cancer (age . Read more...
See genetics. Most breast cancer is NOT due to an inherited risk, but rather occurs by chance. Family history that suggests an inherited risk, such as changes in the BRCA1 gene or BRCA2 gene, include multiple relatives with cancer over more than one generation and younger ages of onset. If you are concerned about an inherited risk, see a geneticist who can assess your family history. Read more...

Family history of breast cancer. Should I get brca testing?

See your doctor. Talk to your doctor regarding your family risks & have a yearly breast examination. Ask if there is a genetic counselor in your area to consult with. Read more...
Depends. Many people have a distant relative who had breast cancer late in life and that is not an indication for brca testing. There are certain criteria like very young breast cancer, male breast cancer, triple negative breast cancer before age 60, and others. Visit your family doc or gyn to see if you need a referral to a genetics health professional for testing. Read more...
Possibly. To figure out if BRCA testing would be useful for you, it depends on the number of individuals with breast cancer in your family, the age at development of breast cancer, degree of relatedness (first-degree etc.), and history of other ancillary cancers. This type of information can determine if you are at higher risk for breast cancer and if you are then BRCA testing may be useful. Read more...

Mother diagnosis with breast cancer at 54, maternal grandmother diagnosis with pancreatic ca at 69. Dr's won't do brca test because there is no other breast/ovarian ca in my family. What do I do? I'm so worried.

See below. You are at higher risk for breast cancer because your mother has had breast cancer. You should consult your health care provider and come up with a screening plan for breast cancer surveillance. Other than breast self examination, nothing likely needs to be done before you are at least 30 years old. Read more...
Pancreatic cancer . Independant. About 5% of breast cancer comes from a famiaial inherited gene and the radar goes off for this when 1st degree relative dx'd prior to age 50. Most likey you do not carry this gene but we use whats called the gail model (look this up) to determine who should be screened. Approx 9% of women will get a breast cancer diagnosis, most are not related to a brca 1 or 2 gene. Read more...
Screening. You should have clinical breast exams starting now, and then at age 40 start with yearly mammograms. It is possible to pay for the brca testing out of pocket if this is truly your desire, because would likely not be covered by insurance. Read more...