3mm sessile polyp-transverse colon;path-adematomous. Mother had colorectal cancer in her 50s.I had breast [email protected];now 56. Follow up COLO how soon?

Add Colgard to CRCS. This patient Hx with cancer before age 50, Right sided polyp,Colon Ca in First degree relative (Mom). Needs VERY DETAILED Family Hx to r/o another relative w/colon polyps or other Cancer ( IF +ve fulfils Amsterdam II Cr). Her polyp should be carefully looked at again with above Hx in mind. If the colon prep was excellent, than repeat colonoscopy within 3 years. A routine visit to Gynaecologist.
A year. If you had only one polyp on a thorough colonoscopy, you can safely wait a year for the next examination. I commend you for taking the preventive step.

Related Questions

Mother has breast cancer at 53, her father had colon at 87, her paternal uncle had aml at 65 and her paternal cousin aml at 50. Hereditary?

Posible. If no other members of your family has breast or colon cancers then your parents has disease at random , not genetic etiology. Your uncle family has acute myeloid leukemia in two members in two generations , possibly genetic ( hereditary ) , may be have cebpa mutation or some thing else , you have to speak to the oncologist with patients permission and may need investigation. Read more...
Likely no. Most of your family members are developing their cancers later in life, and there is not an obvious pattern of inheritance from this limited amount of info. I'd talk about this with your doc and do a quick pedigree analysis. Modern techniques are revealing correlations that we couldn't see in the past. So a good history can be helpful to tease out any possible association. Read more...
Possibly. Rare genetic syndrome called li fraumeni. But could be just sporadic. I think it would be reasonable to do two things: 1) have a CBC done 2) consider meeting with a genetic counselor. Hope this helps. Read more...

Mothers mom had pancreatic cancer at 72, dad had colon at 87, she had had lobular breast cancer at 54. I've had brca testing- negative. Am I at risk?

Doubt. With the negative BRCA tests, your risk of these is much lower. They may identify other genetic tumor markers for these as time goes on. Remember, the majority of colon cancer is found in persons without a family history for it. Read more...
Some risk. There is some risk even though you don't have the BRCA gene mutation. If your own parents, instead of your grandparents, had these diseases your risk would be greater. A geneticist can advise you better,however. Read more...
Not extra risk. Keep up surveillance like everybody else, and good luck. Read more...