6 doctors weighed in:

Can infected teeth cause ocular(silent migraine... Or sinus infection cause it?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Costello
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: It could

Any inflammation in the facial area can trigger a migraine.
There is a large nerve called the trigeminal nerve which is responsible for the pain. Ocular migraines are likely a variant of this. However, if you are having eye symptoms, do not assume they are related to your teeth or sinuses - get it checked!

In brief: It could

Any inflammation in the facial area can trigger a migraine.
There is a large nerve called the trigeminal nerve which is responsible for the pain. Ocular migraines are likely a variant of this. However, if you are having eye symptoms, do not assume they are related to your teeth or sinuses - get it checked!
Thank
Dr. Bruce Saran
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Not directly

Ocular migraines are usually precipitated by stress.
Certain foods such as high caffeine, aged cheeses, red wines, preserved meats can also cause it. Infected teeth can infect the maxillary sinus that is the floor of the orbit where the eye sits. The tissues around the eye get infected causing orbital cellulitis-with puffy infected/inflamed eyelids. Not an ocular migraine.

In brief: Not directly

Ocular migraines are usually precipitated by stress.
Certain foods such as high caffeine, aged cheeses, red wines, preserved meats can also cause it. Infected teeth can infect the maxillary sinus that is the floor of the orbit where the eye sits. The tissues around the eye get infected causing orbital cellulitis-with puffy infected/inflamed eyelids. Not an ocular migraine.
Thank
Dr. Robert Didier
General Practice

In brief: No

Infections are not triggers for migraines, these headaches, which come in many guises, are thought to be caused by disruption of chemical neurotransmitters in the trigeminal nerve nucleus of the brain stem. The imbalance can cause neurovascular hyperexcitability of the cerebral cortex and resulting symptoms.
Serotonin is one of the main transmitters involved. Mood, foods and hormones are triggers.

In brief: No

Infections are not triggers for migraines, these headaches, which come in many guises, are thought to be caused by disruption of chemical neurotransmitters in the trigeminal nerve nucleus of the brain stem. The imbalance can cause neurovascular hyperexcitability of the cerebral cortex and resulting symptoms.
Serotonin is one of the main transmitters involved. Mood, foods and hormones are triggers.
Thank
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