What are some rehab or physical therapy exercises for a torn rotator cuff?

Rotator cuff. Posture principle of the shoulder is key. Can begin with "scapular stabilization" exercises and progress to rotator cuff exercises including "thrower 10" exercises. Google or bing the above for pictures and descriptions.

Related Questions

Over a year ago I was diagnosed w/ a torn rotator cuff. PT was suggested but I never went. Am I still able to do physical therapy even after a year?

Yes. Yes, you can still do physical therapy. Physical therapy can help with decreasing pain and restoring range of motion. They can help you learn exercises to do at home as well. Good luck and see the physical therapist. Read more...

Can a torn rotator cuff (1.2 CM) be treated with physical therapy and anti inflammatory rx?

Worth a try.... I've found that MRI findings and degree of pathology can be misleading, and look worse than the clinical picture (how much pain and disability you are actually having). So, would recommend conservative measures: heat when at rest, ice after excess using the shoulder, anti-inflammatory therapy under a physician's guidance, and yes, physical therapy. If remains a problematic shoulder, surgical rx. Read more...
Yes, sometimes. Some rotator cuff tears will symptomatically improve with physical therapy, nsaids, +/- corticosteroid injection; therefore non-operative treatment should be tried first (unless your tear was traumatic or there is other specific reason in your case to operate sooner). Cuff tears generally do not heal on their own so if non-op tx (pt, nsaids, etc) fails (symptoms persist), consider surgery. Read more...
Rotator cuff tear. A torn rotator cuff tendon (tendon insertion detached from upper humerus) cannot heal by itself. People may choose to live with a rotator cuff tear, however very active individuals may still experience pain with activity. Sometimes pain may continue at rest, especially sleep. When this occurs, surgery is recomended. Non-operative treatment consists of nsaids and physical therapy. Good luck! Read more...
Not full thickness. If the 1.2 cm tear in your rotator cuff goes all the way through the tendon, then non-operative treatment is unlikely to completely resolve your symptoms. The rotator cuff helps to move the shoulder joint and when it becomes torn from the bone, it's function is compromised. Full-thickness rotator cuff tears do not heal on there own and small tears progress to large years over time. Get it fixed! Read more...

Tried physical therapy OTC pain killers and tramadol for torn rotator cuff. Nothing has worked. What is something I could getthat won't make me sick?

Torn Rotator cuff. A corticosteroid injection is something to try that may help. If the rotator cuff is torn, has orthopedic surgery considered surgical repair? Rest with gentle movements to maintain shoulder mobility can allow you to heal. Ice and heat applications may help. Perhaps a higher dose or stronger NSAID by prescription, if not allergic, plus 650mg tylenol (acetaminophen) together might work. Read more...

Can you get back to full function with enough physical therapy after a rotator cuff tear?

It depends. If the rotator cuff tear is small and the muscles have not atropied significantly between the time of the tear and the time of the reconstruction, you should get much if not all of your function back. For this to happen it is very important to do your rehab after surgery. Read more...
Depends. It sounds like you are asking whether you can treat your tear with pt alone and avoid the need for an operation. This is a complex topic especially at your young age. Often in young patients like you we see rotator cuff tears in association with instability. I would recommend you consult with a shoulder specialist to get a clearer understanding of prognosis. http://www.theshouldercenter.com/vid. Read more...
It is possible. Usually the smaller tears can do pretty well with physical therapy and regain pretty good function. Read more...

Will predizone help tendonitis? Will physical therapy help a rotator cuff tear?

Sometimes. Prednisone is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication. It can reduce pain and inflammation for tendonitis but it should be used sparingly for this purpose due to side effects. PT can help some patients with rotator cuff tears, but not all. Conservative treatment for rotator cuff tears is often the preferable initial treatment for most patients. You should be evaluated by an orthopaedic doctor. Read more...
Prednisone. Prednisone can help with tendonitis but patients should carefully monitor blood sugar. Prednisone can raise blood sugar significantly. Prolonged treatment with prednisone may require adjustment of you medications. A partial tear of the rotator cuff does not require treatment unless there is pain. A partial tear can be effectively treated with therapy, the aim being to maintain range of motion. Read more...

I have calcification tendonitis and a partial rotator cuff tear in my left shoulder. I have done 6 weeks of physical therapy but it is still giving me?

Still have options. Every case is unique, but more time, keeping up with a religious icing program +/- an anti-inflammatory in addition to the exercises may still improve things. An injection and/or a needling procedure to break up the calcium deposits may be an option. If those fail and your symptoms are still significant in 6-12 wks you my be a candidate for arthroscopic surgery, although many pts can avoid the or. Read more...
Several Options. Calcification can occur for several reasons in the rotator cuff and in several locations. The classic calcific tendinosis that describes a collection of calcium is typically a bit away from the tendon insertion and has a well defined life cycle that most often gets better without surgical intervention. Degenerative or postinjury calcification can signal a failing or torn rotator cuff. Read more...

I was in MVA. MRI shows Rotator cuff tear, labra tear and tendinitis on shoulder. EMG shows pinched nerve. Will Physical Therapy help and how long?

Can't answer w/o inf. The space here is limited to provide a good answer to your question. You should speak to an Orthopedic Surgeon or sports medicine doctor (rehab?) to answer this question. Generally, rest, ice, & compression is used to help support healing. Anti-inflammatories like Tylenol (acetaminophen) could be used also. Later on, rehab is used when healing has started but timing is up to the surgeon. Read more...