Which are the risks in a fallot correction surgery?

Tetralogy of Fallot. The answer depends on the type of operation. Typically tof surgery involves ventricular septal defect closure, right ventricular muscle bundle division/resection, and relief of any pulmonary valve stenosis (with a transannular patch or right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit). Risks of the surgery include residual vsd, pulmonary stenosis, pulmonary insufficiency, and ventricular dysfunction.
Early and late. Potential early risks: arrhythmia, residula shunt across vsd, residual narrowing at the pulmonary valve or below it, bleeding and infection. Late risks involved arrhythmia, right ventricular conduction and dilatation causing right heart failure.

Related Questions

Which are the risks in a fallot correction surgery?

Depends quite a bit. For children who have have non-emergency surgery at < 1 year old at a hospital that does at least 200 childhood heart surgeries per year, the risk of death is probably about 1%. Other severe risks such as stroke, severe infection or need for pacemaker are uncommon, but occur. The surgeon will give you more accurate info. Without surgery 50% of children die by 6 years of age. Read more...
Low, but real. As with any heart surgery there are small risks of infection, bleeding, rhythm disturbances, but should be about 2%. The risk of not repairing tetralogy of fallot is serious risk of death in childhood. Most children are repaired at a few months of age, and many will require a second surgery, pulmonary valve replacement, before reaching adulthood. Read more...
It varies. Repair of tetralogy of fallot, like other congenital heart defects, is a complex matter. Many different factors may influence the outcome, including the initial diagnosis, the anatomy of the defect, the surgeon and institution capability. Having said this, the current outcome form surgical repair is quite good. Long term outcome may also be depend on diligent follow up. Read more...