6 doctors weighed in:

If you are allergic to bees do you need to carry an epipen (epinephrine)?

6 doctors weighed in
Christopher Breen
General Practice
4 doctors agree

In brief: Bee allergy

It depends on the reaction you have to a bee sting.
If your throat starts to swell and it becomes difficult to breath; i would definitely recommend carrying an epi-pen. Additionally it is important to see an allergist to be tested. Venom immunotherapy is highly successful in reducing the chances of repeat reactions including anaphylaxis.

In brief: Bee allergy

It depends on the reaction you have to a bee sting.
If your throat starts to swell and it becomes difficult to breath; i would definitely recommend carrying an epi-pen. Additionally it is important to see an allergist to be tested. Venom immunotherapy is highly successful in reducing the chances of repeat reactions including anaphylaxis.
Christopher Breen
Christopher Breen
Answer assisted by Christopher Breen, Medical Student
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Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Your call

If you had more than mild sneezing, wheezing, and/or hives from you last beesting, you'd do well to get an Epinephrine needle.
Better safe than sorry.

In brief: Your call

If you had more than mild sneezing, wheezing, and/or hives from you last beesting, you'd do well to get an Epinephrine needle.
Better safe than sorry.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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Dr. Steven Cohen
Internal Medicine - Allergy

In brief: Depends

The first point is to define allergy and to detemine what insect may be the offending agent.
Allergic reactions require symptoms distant to the sting site. A large local swelling is not enough. Hives, generalized swelling, wheezing or other breathing or circulatory problems suggest true allergy. Knowing the circumstance of the sting can help identify the insect. Diagnosis can be confirmed.

In brief: Depends

The first point is to define allergy and to detemine what insect may be the offending agent.
Allergic reactions require symptoms distant to the sting site. A large local swelling is not enough. Hives, generalized swelling, wheezing or other breathing or circulatory problems suggest true allergy. Knowing the circumstance of the sting can help identify the insect. Diagnosis can be confirmed.
Dr. Steven Cohen
Dr. Steven Cohen
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