4 doctors weighed in:

I tested positive for hsv 2 with 3.1 igg but negative for hsv 1 The weird thing is when I was pregnant I was tested and didn't have hsv 2 but had hsv?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
2 doctors agree

In brief: HSV2, prob not HSV1

Probably you meant positive for HSV1 when pregnant, right? Was that a blood test or swab test from a genital lesion? The blood test is less reliable for HSV1 than HSV2.
Or maybe lab reporting error and you really had HSV2. At present, you can be quite sure you have HSV2 (almost certainly genital). But speak with your doctor about confirmatory testing, ideally with a Western blot test. Good luck!

In brief: HSV2, prob not HSV1

Probably you meant positive for HSV1 when pregnant, right? Was that a blood test or swab test from a genital lesion? The blood test is less reliable for HSV1 than HSV2.
Or maybe lab reporting error and you really had HSV2. At present, you can be quite sure you have HSV2 (almost certainly genital). But speak with your doctor about confirmatory testing, ideally with a Western blot test. Good luck!
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
The HSV Western blot test is the most reliable way to clarify uncertain HSV blood test results. It is available only at the Univeristy of Washington clinical lab in Seattle, where WB was developed and researched, but a doctor or lab can arrange to send a specimen for testing. They'll probably be willing to do WB if they know about the discrepancy in previous test results.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology

In brief: I wouldn't worry

Truth is, herpes bloodwork isn't all that accurate.
Nobody knows what it means to have antibodies but never express lesions, as many people do. Are these antibodies due to something else? This remains unanswered.

In brief: I wouldn't worry

Truth is, herpes bloodwork isn't all that accurate.
Nobody knows what it means to have antibodies but never express lesions, as many people do. Are these antibodies due to something else? This remains unanswered.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Ed Friedlander
I'd urge you to talk about this with your physician. In the past, many of us have set little by these antibodies, but there does seem more agreement today that a positive titer means likely infection and the possibility of transmitting. For more on screening people for asymptomatic herpes, see http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/821875_2
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Dennis Higginbotham
Board Certified, Obstetrics & Gynecology
27 years in practice
49M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors