Which type of genetic mutation can cause breast cancer?

BRCA. The most commonly described genetic mutations associated with family history include brca1 and brca2 gene mutations. There are several other familial cancer syndromes though, and can be related to other genes such as p53 (li fraumeni syndrome) and pten (cowden's disease). Hereditary genetic syndromes as a whole are rare and comprise only about 10% of patients who have breast cancer.

Related Questions

What type of genetic mutation causes breast cancer?

Many. If you inherit mutated brca1 or brca2 from a parent, your odds are greatly increased. All cancers arise from accumulated mutations and natural selection over your own lifetime, but these can actually be passed from parent to child. Read more...

I have extra genetic mutations for breast cancer & heart failure What's the likelihood that these genes will turn on & can I use diet to keep them off?

Complex genetics. Recommendations on gene mutations are best given by a medical geneticist, who needs a detailed understanding of the exact test that you had done and the detailed results. Many gene mutations cause a loss of function so you don't necessarily want to turn off the mutated gene. Modern genetics is discovering many genetic markers that convey only small risk of disease, and may require no treatment. Read more...

Is breast cancer caused by a mutation in the gene or by a problem with the gene expression?

Gene mutation. If not a genetically inherited , environmental conditions initiate the induction of the breast lesion. The most common mutation occurs with the long terminal repeat of the MMTV virus enters the Wnt-1 gene. This produces an over expression of B-catenin which results in transformation. EBV infection probably needed for FGARAT production that acts to overexpress telomerase inducing immortality. Read more...

Is breast cancer genetic or caused by the environment or both?

Both. Only 10-20% of breast cancers are genetically related. We are not sure what causes the remainder, but environmental factors (such as the organochloride pesticides that were sprayed 30-50 years ago) are potentially responsible. Estrogen replacement is contributing to some, and the fact that women are living to be older with each generation increases the number of elderly breast cancer. Read more...
Yes. App. 10-15% of all breast cancers are believed to be related to hereditary risks; therefore, in a sense, the other 85-90% are related to "environmental" factors. Unfortunately, we don't know what specific triggers are responsible for breast cancer development; but, we do know that breast cancer occurs much more frequently in developed countries. This, regrettably, is a disease of modern life. Read more...

What are the non-genetic causes of breast cancer for the women?

Our Environment. Most cases of breast cancer in the US are unrelated to genetics and are believed to be due to our environment. Breast cancer is a disease of the modern world and is much less common in developing nations. Whether it is a byproduct of what we breathe and/or what we eat, the exact causes are unclear. However, we do see cancer more commonly in women with early menarche, late menopause, etc. Read more...
Multifactorial. The majority of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer. Risk factors include estrogen therapy, obesity, early menarche, late menopause, and sometimes just plain bad luck. Read more...

My mom had two types of very aggressive breast cancer. I'm almost 30, would it be wise to ask for genetic testing?

Yes. For femalles with any first degree relative mother sister grandmother with breast caner should consider the bracca genetic testing. While not 100% it will tell you what your relative risk is and allow more agressivive monitoring with mammograms and perhaps mris. But it may along with counseling help you decided what you would like to do to prevent the risk or watch more closely to catch it early. Read more...
Yes. It depends on other factors, like your mom's age at diagnosis. If she was under 50, and particularly if you have other first-degree relatives with breast cancer (sister, daughter) or ovarian cancer, you may be at risk for carrying the brca gene. Ask for genetic counseling instead of genetic testing, as the type of test you need depends on a more extensive review of your history. Good luck! Read more...
Possibly-for mom 1st. Risk factors for possible brca mutation are family histories that include multiple family members, bilateral or multiple cancers in one family member, male breast cancer, young age of diagnosis (<50/premenopausal esp early 40s/30s), ovarian cancer, & certain ethnic groups (ashkenazi jewish). Current guidelines also include triple neg & age <60. Testing should start with an affected indiv first. Read more...
Yes. The best person to test is your mother since she is at very high risk of having a positive due to her double primary breast cancer. If she is positive, you have a 50% chance of being positive. If she is no longer alive, you can be tested, but even if you are negative, you are still at high risk of breast cancer since we don't know if your mother was positive or negative. Read more...

My mom had breast cancer. She is doing well but she has the braca 2 mutation. What are the chances she passed it down to me? When should I get tested?

50% Your chance of having your mother's mutation is 50% and you could test now that you are sexually mature. You only need to test for that particular mutation (single site analysis) unless there is suspicious family history in your dad's side too or you are of eastern europe jewish ethnicity. One of the families i follow has a different mutation from each side, so it can happen. Best to you. Read more...