How are celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis different?

Totally different. While both are autoimmune diseases, celiac is basically a GI disease characterized by a sensitivity to wheat (gluten) and hepatitis is characterized by inflammation involving the liver.
The target. Most would understand that the antibodies you develop after a measles shot attack the measles virus, not the flu virus. In the same way, the antibodies that develop in celiac attack the tissues specific to the intestine and not the liver cells. Autoimmune doesn't mean the whole system attacks itself, it is usually quite specific to the target selected.

Related Questions

What are the differences between celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis problems?

Very different. Celiac disease is an allergy to a protein found in wheat called gluten. It can be associated with abnormal liver tests but usually is associated with anemia, diarrhea or other intestinal issues. Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease affecting the liver caused by an overactive immune system. Both are likely genetically predetermined but not generally related to each other. Read more...
Location of effect. Celiac involves an immune reaction that triggers antibodies that injure your intestinal absorptive lining. Autoimmune hepatitis is a similar immune reaction but the antibodies attack liver cells. Both are errors in the immune system, but the antibodies and their target are different. Read more...

Is celiac disease considered an autoimmune disease?

Yes. Celiac disease (celiac sprue, gluten allergy) is a strong allergic reaction to gluten, a protein seen in grains such as wheat, rye, barley, etc... Technically speaking, the reaction is not a typical food allergy reaction, but is an abnormal immune system reaction that causes inflammation and damage to the lining of one's own small intestine. Read more...

Why is celiac disease considered an autoimmune disease? Does it affect the immune system?

Terminology. If the body develops antibodies to human tissue of any type,it is labeled auto immune.In celiac disease and lesser forms of gluten sensitivity, the body has developed antibodies to tissue transglutaminases.These can cause injury to the absorptive surfaces of the small intestines and impair absorption of nutrients.Nutritional deficits can weaken the body but are not specific to the immune system. Read more...

Is it absolutely impossible to have celiac disease without positive blood tests and biopsy? Even with all symptoms and other autoimmune diseases?

Very unlikely. The gold standard of celiac disease is the small bowel biopsy. Blood tests, if positive are helpful. You don't provide enough clinical detail to give you more specific advice. Denmark has several excellent hospitals and medical schools.I suggest you should be evaluated in a tertiary medical center.l. Read more...

Long family history of autoimmune diseases. I have hypothyroidism and celiac disease. I've noticed new symptoms. Could I develop other autoimmunes?

You can but. Why worry about getting another disease? Focusing on your current conditions & findings ways to gain health and remain healthy will do your mind and body good. Celiac is associated many other conditions. At 19 years old, you should try to enjoy life, work on your dreams and let your doctors do the worrying for you. Going for your follow-ups and reporting new symptoms is the best thing you can do. Read more...

I have celiacs disease, what should I look out for regarding other autoimmune disorders?

None. Celiac disease is not an autoimmune disorder. It is more a sensitivuty to gluten, perhaps a toxic or allergic reaction. I do not think you need to worry about autoimmune disorders related to celiac disease. Read more...
Celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder and associated with other autoimmune disorders. Most commonly checked routinely is the thyroid blood test looking for autoimmune thyroiditis (underactive thyroid gland). In general there is not much routine screening for other autoimmune diseases like lupus, hepatitis, anemia, etc. Unless there are specific symptoms or abnormal routine blood tests. Read more...