13 doctors weighed in:

Can an electrocardiogram prevent sudden cardiac arrest in young teenagers/adults who die during marathons?

13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Screen test

ECG is used because it is relatively inexpensive.
We have no good cost effective screening test. Cardiac arrest is rare when compared to the numbers of exercising population. Tests become more effective when a specific question within the effectiveness of the test are the reason for the test.

In brief: Screen test

ECG is used because it is relatively inexpensive.
We have no good cost effective screening test. Cardiac arrest is rare when compared to the numbers of exercising population. Tests become more effective when a specific question within the effectiveness of the test are the reason for the test.
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
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Dr. Volkan Tuzcu
Pediatrics - Cardiology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Sudden death

In some it can detect a sign but not in all

In brief: Sudden death

In some it can detect a sign but not in all
Dr. Volkan Tuzcu
Dr. Volkan Tuzcu
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Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

Deaths in triathlons are mostly from drowning.
Deaths in distance runners are mostly from electrolyte troubles. Sudden death warnings on EKG include long QT and Brugada which seldom kill during exercise. I would trust history and auscultation (for HCMP, etc) for warnings and think EKG offers less yield.

In brief: No

Deaths in triathlons are mostly from drowning.
Deaths in distance runners are mostly from electrolyte troubles. Sudden death warnings on EKG include long QT and Brugada which seldom kill during exercise. I would trust history and auscultation (for HCMP, etc) for warnings and think EKG offers less yield.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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1 comment
Dr. Luis Eguiguren
This is a quote from the March 2013 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: "Cardiomyopathy has been consistently demonstrated as the most common cause of exercise-related SCD in young athletes..."
Dr. Frank Kuitems
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Maybe

valuation to prevent said nothing athletes can be done by an exam by my making position and or cardiologist and echocardiogram and EKG along with a family history can help identify some of the risk factors .
I doing these things this can decrease some of the risk of sudden death by knowing some of the high-risk patients

In brief: Maybe

valuation to prevent said nothing athletes can be done by an exam by my making position and or cardiologist and echocardiogram and EKG along with a family history can help identify some of the risk factors .
I doing these things this can decrease some of the risk of sudden death by knowing some of the high-risk patients
Dr. Frank Kuitems
Dr. Frank Kuitems
Thank
Dr. Shamail Tariq
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: Maybe

An EKG can't prevent it but it may help find suggestive findings that put one at high risk and some communities are implementing these screening tools to look for Brugada, Long QT, LVH, etc, which are the more common threats.

In brief: Maybe

An EKG can't prevent it but it may help find suggestive findings that put one at high risk and some communities are implementing these screening tools to look for Brugada, Long QT, LVH, etc, which are the more common threats.
Dr. Shamail Tariq
Dr. Shamail Tariq
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Dr. Luis Eguiguren
Pediatrics

In brief: Prevent sudden death

There are 2 main reasons young athletes suffer sudden death: arrytmias, which risk may show on an ECG and anatomical abnormalities such as IHSS (Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis) or aberrant coronary arteries, which may show on an Echocardiogram.
Some phycisians think both tests should be done to extreme athletes, prior to participation.

In brief: Prevent sudden death

There are 2 main reasons young athletes suffer sudden death: arrytmias, which risk may show on an ECG and anatomical abnormalities such as IHSS (Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis) or aberrant coronary arteries, which may show on an Echocardiogram.
Some phycisians think both tests should be done to extreme athletes, prior to participation.
Dr. Luis Eguiguren
Dr. Luis Eguiguren
Thank
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