Related Questions

What ais the survival rate from pancreatic cancer after a whipple procedure?

10% If a patient is a candidate for a Whipple, meaning no nodes or spread of tumor at the 1-2yr interval the survival is 10%. This may change since new immunothrapeutics are being developed. It will require a vaccine which turns on humoral immunity to produce the necessary monoclonals to prevent recurrent. The vaccine has been developed for tumor specific protein and not GVAX. Read more...

What is the rate of survival for pancreatic cancer?

Depends on stage. Median survival 6-7 months. Also depends on response to treatment. Read more...
Pancreatic cancer. The term pancreatic cancer usually refers specifically to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the most common type. While there are other pancreatic tumors with a good prognosis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a very aggressive tumor. Unfortunately, most patients with this cancer are diagnosed late, at a point when achieving a cure is exceedingly rare. Read more...

Which disease has a higher survival rate? Ovarian or pancreatic cancer

Ovarian usually. Ovarian cancers generally have a better survival then pancreatic tumors but there are several factors to consider the stage at time of surgery, the cell type of the cancer, the response to chemotherapy and of course, the underlying health of the patient. Read more...

Is snus a safe alternative to cigarettes? Snus is being touted as a safe alternative to cigarettes. Studies cite low if non-existent rates of associated lung cancer, with a very mild uptick in pancreatic cancer - the studies were carried out in sweden, a

Snus . Snus is also known as swedish snuff and is a moist powder tobacco product originated from a variant of dry snuff in the early 19th century in sweden, consumed by placing it under the lip for extended periods of time. While it has been touted as an alternative to smoking and traditional "chewing" tobacco, there are concerns regarding health risks associated with its use. Although some say smokeless tobacco poses fewer health risks than cigarettes, they note that it has been linked to various types of cancer and warn against using any tobacco product. There are contradictory studies on the risk for cancer and other health problems. In a study from the karolinska institute in stockholm, sweden, published in the international journal of cancer in 2008 found a statistically significant increase in the incidence of the combined category of oral and pharyngeal cancer among daily users of snus (incidence rate ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.5-6.6) was found. Overall mortality was also slightly increased (hazard ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.21). In an earlier study published in lancet in 2007, snus use was independently associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (relative risk for ever-users of snus 2.0; 95% ci 1.2-3.3, compared with never-users of any tobacco), but was unrelated to incidence of oral (0.8, 95% ci 0.4-1.7) and lung cancer (0.8, 0.5-1.3). These differences may also lie in the variations of smokeless tobacco in the marketplace. In a study from 2008, researchers found a large variation in the levels of some toxic compounds and carcinogens analyzed in american and swedish smokeless tobaccos. Based on this and other studies, while smokeless tobaccos provide some protection against lung cancer, the overall health risks or benefits have not been clearly determined and the best advice is to avoid using any tobacco at all. Read more...
This . This is a great question. Before i provide any more information, it is important to let you know that because of the decline in sales of tobacco products, nasal snuff may be receiving a lot of press by the tobacco industry in order to improve sales. The second issue is that there has not been an abundance of medical studies on the effects of dry nasal snuff in humans. Dry nasal snuff has been used in europe for hundreds of years. Snuff has different health risks than smoking tobacco or use of wet snuff in the mouth. Dry snuff presents with a lower risk for cardiovascular disease compared to smoking. This could at least in part be due to the fact that snuff does not involve the combustion of carcinogenic materials in tobacco that way that smoking does. Chronic abuse of dry snuff creates changes in the nose. It can lead to atrophy of some of the turbinates and metaplastic changes of some of the tissues in the nose. It can also inhibit mucus clearance by cilia in the nose. There are a paucity of studies regarding cancer and dry snuff. It is being suggested that nasal snuff could be used as substitution therapy for someone who is trying to quit smoking. This is because nicotine is absorbed at a similar rate when using nasal snuff or smoking. One of the problems is that nicotine dependence can occur with any form of tobacco use. The bottom line is that it is not safe to repeatedly take tobacco into the body in any form. Argueably, use of dry snuff has less risk of certain types of health problems than smoking. . Read more...

How can I survive pancreatic cancer?

Clinical trial. I would suggest that you consider a clinical trial. Find a national cancer institute designated cancer center near you (www.Cancer.Gov) and consider enrolling in a clinical trial. Read more...
Survival. If there is no evidence of distant metastasis and it can be resected, the highest survival is achieved through surgical resection (whipples procedure) followed by chemotherapy +/- radiation. Read more...