What can be done for implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus heart bypass surgery?

Different indication. Aicd for arrhythmias and ventricular tachycardia and does not revascularize. Bypass for coronary blockage (which can have arrhythmias) to improve circulation and sometimes stops arrhythmias induced by ischemia- low flow.

Related Questions

Is an implantable cardioverter defibrillator removed in heart bypass surgery?

No. The defib. Device is implatnted in the inner chambers of the heart and bypass is on the out side of the heart where the coronary arteries lie.Unless theres another reason to remove the device ie an infection the device is left in. Read more...
Nope. We just turn it off so it doesn't go off during the case from cautery noise. Read more...

I can't decide: implantable cardioverter defibrillator or heart bypass surgery?

Specialist Needed. This is a type of question you should take up with a physician who specializes in heart disease. There is no answer applicable to the general population. The ansewr to this question must be individualized to you and your circumstances. Read more...
Different things. Bypass surgery (CABG) treats the blockages in the heart vessels, while the defibrillator (icd) treats dangerous heart beats such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. A person may need both, depending on their medical condition. Read more...

What patients should get an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (icd) for heart failure?

See Below. This is somewhat complex and will not all fit in 400 characters so I am creating initials. 1. Ischemic cardiomyopathy, i.C., with ejection fraction, ef, >30% but <35%, newyorkheartassoc, nyha, class ii or iii, and >30 days post mi/revascularization. 2. Ic, ef <30%. 3. Ic, ef between 36-40% with inducible ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, 4. Non-ic with ef <35% and nyha class ii or greater. Read more...
New Guidelines. This is somewhat complex and will not all fit in 400 characters so I am creating initials. 1. Ischemic cardiomyopathy, i.C., with ejection fraction, ef, >30% but <35%, newyork heartassoc, nyha, class ii or iii, and >30 days post mi/revascularization. 2. Ic, ef <30%. 3. Ic, ef between 36-40% with inducible ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, 4. Non-ic with ef <35% and nyha class ii or greater. Read more...

What benefit does the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator give to patients who have had a cardiac arrest or heart attack?

Prevent recurrence. Depending on the reason for cardiac arrest, an automatic implantable defibrillator can be very effective in preventing a second cardiac arrest in the future. Read more...
It may prevent death. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (icds) are used to treat ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, which if untreated, may cause a fatal cardiac arrest. Icds can often quickly treat these conditions before permanent brain or heart damage can be done. Icds are not used to treat or prevent heart attacks, which are a "plumbing" issue. Read more...

How do you relieve pain from implantable cardioverter defibrillator surgery?

Pain and AICD. Post-operative pain is normal but should not be excessive. First, what is the cause of the pain? If the surgical site is red, swollen, or oozing fluid, contact the implanting physician immediately. The problem could be serious. Read more...
Tylenol (acetaminophen) It will improve over time- it is uncomfortable because it is quite a large device under the skin, but your body will get use to it. Until then just tylenol, (acetaminophen) and perhaps advil if you can tolerate it. Good luck. Read more...

What happens during surgery of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

AICD Surgery. Aicd or automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator surgery is done under deep sedation anesthesia. Chest veins are entered and two or three leads are placed into the heart in the right venticle & atrium, and coronary sinus. The leads are connected to the aicd pacemaker and placed under the skin in your chest. The device is checked to be certain that it will function if a rhythm problem. Read more...
Sedation. The patient is sedated or anesthetized. Incision is made. Venous access is done. Needle, introducers, and wires are passed to proper position with fluoroscopic - xray control and tested electronically. Then a device nice - the aicd is attached. The wound is closed. Read more...

Is a vascular ultrasound always done before heart bypass surgery?

Vascular ultrasound. Vascular ultrasound is often a part of a complete vascular workup before bypass is needed. It may not be necessary for emergency surgey. Read more...
Yes . Some kind of ultrasound imaging is almost always done before heart surgery. Carotid artery screening or saphenous vein mapping would be most common. Read more...
Echocardiography. Echocardiograms are ultrasound type test looking at how efficient the heart is working and how the valves are doing and yes it is part of the evaluation that can lead to a recommendation for heart surgery. Read more...