Liver and peritoneal mets from colon cancer. Chemo not working well. We are uk Based, can Germany be considered for TACE treatment and for peritineal procedure?

Yes. Germany can offer TACE ( transarterial chemo-emboliation. While relatively effective one may also use radiolabelled microspheres to replace the chemo portion of the treatment. One has to consider hyperthermic chemo perfusion of the peritoneal cavity since TACE will not effect peritoneal mets. If all fail, protocol available in US for Neo-102 mAb to treat recurrent colon failing other procedur.
Yes. Since cancer therapy has become very specialized in recent years, you should look at the individual treatment center or the institute and read posted reviews by treated patients at those centers, rather than focusing on the country. Germany like many Western European countries have very sophisticated cancer treatment centers, with advanced medical machines, they are known to have invented for long.

Related Questions

Can TACE be done on the liver for liver mets if there are peritoneal mets for metastic colon cancer?

Yes. But probably not advised since peritoneal mets are more rapidly fatal than liver mets. Has your oncologist suggested intra-abdominal installation of chemotherapy This article may help http://jjco.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/12/571.full. Read more...

If chemotherapy fails what options lfd metastic colon cancer? Mets to liver, peritoneal, lymph node?

Experimental therapy. Some cancer centers do research on patients with aggressive cancers or cancers who do not respond to usual treatment. Although after chemotherapy, there are not very many options and people would like to keep patients as comfortable as possible. Hope it is helpful. Read more...

Pt with metastic colon cancer with liver and peritoneal Mets. Can this cause vomitting and fever?

Possible. It depends on many factors, but those are both possible. Best to see the oncologist for more specifics details regarding your case. Hope this helps! Read more...
Yes. Liver and peritoneal mets are not uncommon when a large colon lesion invadesi the blood stream. Vomiting is a sign of retrograde movement of GI content to stomach and up into esophagus. Inflammatory changes associated with the site of the primary can induce the febrile response. PET/CAT can show extent of spread and also visualize partial intestinal obstruction for which decompression required. Read more...