6 doctors weighed in:

Is there any treatment like ayaurveda or homeo for arthritis following chickungunya?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes, homeopathy

Homeopathy can be effective in chikungunya fever -- a viral disease spread by infected mosquitoes -- and post-chikungunya chronic arthritis.
It is not only one medicine for everyone, but individualized homeopathic treatment for each patient so affected. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23870379 for a review of homeopathy in immunology: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/21622275.

In brief: Yes, homeopathy

Homeopathy can be effective in chikungunya fever -- a viral disease spread by infected mosquitoes -- and post-chikungunya chronic arthritis.
It is not only one medicine for everyone, but individualized homeopathic treatment for each patient so affected. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23870379 for a review of homeopathy in immunology: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/21622275.
Thank
Dr. Gary Cunningham
Phlebology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: There is no

conclusive clinical research evidence that homeopathy has any active effect on any medical condition at all.
This is not surprising since homeopathic nostrums generally contain no active ingredient. Ayurvedic remedies generally contain active substances, but there is no body of well performed research to indicate whether or not they are effective. Don't waste your money.

In brief: There is no

conclusive clinical research evidence that homeopathy has any active effect on any medical condition at all.
This is not surprising since homeopathic nostrums generally contain no active ingredient. Ayurvedic remedies generally contain active substances, but there is no body of well performed research to indicate whether or not they are effective. Don't waste your money.
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Scott Keith
Of course, if you feel a whole lot better with the treatments, why stop.
Dr. Gary Cunningham
That's a thought. Deliberate use of placebos arguably has a place in healthcare. Another thought would be that if a treatment has no known mechanism of action and no convincing clinical evidence of efficacy, then either active promotion of that treatment or indirect support by failing to point out its apparent impotence may do harm overall even if an individual patient is not harmed.
Dr. Kenneth Merriman
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: WHAT???

Not really sure what you are asking.

In brief: WHAT???

Not really sure what you are asking.
Thank