Do you think Atrial Fibrillation would improve with an ablation? Only remedy so far is cardioversion

Yes. RF ablation for atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter in good hands ought to be curative. Factors that determine success: electrophysiologists experience and record of success, duration of AF; size and function of Left atrium. Good luck! .

Related Questions

Does anyone know a person who had a cardioversion for atrial fibrillation?

Yes. Cardioversion is used in some patients with atrial fibrillation in an attempt to return to sinus rhythm (the normal rhythm). This is usually done in newly confirmed diagnoses of afib. Before elective cardioversion, the doctor also needs to be sure there is no clot already present in the heart. If converted to sinus, long-term Coumadin (warfarin) may not be necessary. It is needed for a short period however. Read more...
I do. We perform cardioversions as an absolutely routine part of our practice in cardiac electrophysiology. It is a safe and well-tolerated procedure which can restore normal rhythm for many patients. Read more...

How many times can you perform cardioversion to revert atrial fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm?

There is no limit. However, there is not much point in doing it repeatedly if the patient continues to go back into fibrillation especially if on medicine to maintain normal rhythm. Patients can do quite well even if in fibrillation as long as the heart rate is controlled with medication. Read more...
No limit. There is no limit. However, if atrial fibrillation keeps recurring, it would make more sense to explore other options (medications, ablation) rather than to keep undergoing cardioversions - which are not risk free. Read more...

I have atrial fibrillation and am considering whether or not to have cardioversion?

Cardioversion. The shorter the duration of atrial fibrillation the more effective cardioversion is at converting the rhythm. When underlying cardiac pathology like mitral insufficiency or stenosis is present, keeping the patient out of atrial fibrillation or converting the rhythm is quite problematic.The procedure is low risk for most people if they have been anticoagulated for several weeks beforehand as needed. Read more...
If you do... Make sure that your provider is either keeping you on good anticoagulation for the 3 weeks before or performs a "tee" procedure at the time of cardioversion to minimize the stroke risk. The advantages of doing the cardioversion are that you'll know whether you feel better in sinus rhythm than you do with fib, and you'll know how easily you can hold normal (sinus) rhythm. Read more...

What is the indication for surgical ablation (av node ablation) for atrial fibrillation?

Rate control. To control the ventricular response rate (pulse rate) to the atrial fibrillation when all other medications have failed, contraindicated, or are not tolerated due to unacceptable side effects. Read more...
Varies. Cather ablation of the av node is reserved for patients who can not get the pulse rate under control by any other method - it is usually only used as a last resort. Before this, medications are tried, and usually some sort of catheter ablation for atrial fib specifically (not just the av node). A pacemaker is required prior to av node ablation. Read more...
AF ablation. Patients with atrial fibrillation and have difficulty controlling their rate can be treated with an av node ablation which is a procedure that damages the av node so that it won't conduct the beat. This results in complete heart block and is treated with a pacemaker. More recent treatments for af include an af ablation which gets rid of the af directly and does not require a pacemaker. Read more...
Definitive Control. We don't generally do this with surgery, but rather with a "catheter" based procedure (wire we thread into the heart that cauterizes the av node). This procedure provides complete control of the heart rate in the lower chamber and excellent symptom control, but makes people dependent on the pacemaker that *must* be implanted with this procedure. Read more...

How safe is a cardiac ablation? Will it help to cure atrial fibrillation? If it does, will I have to continue taking medication

Usually safe. Although many serious complications can occur during an ablation, when performed by a skilled physician with plenty if experience in a good hospital it is usually very safe. When successful an ablation may allow a patient to come off medications prescribed for the arrhythmia which was ablated. Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia which can be cured with ablation. Read more...

I understand that atrial fibrillation is a type of arrhythmia. Is ablation used to treat only afib or other arrhythmia conditions?

Many dysrhythmias. Ablation is a procedure used to treat many different types of dysrhythmias; atrial fibrillation is only the latest in a long line of dysrhythmias treated successfully by ablation. Ablative therapy has been used to treat supraventicular tachycardias such as av nodal reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, wolff-parkinson-white and others. It is also used to treat types of ventricular tachycardias. Read more...
Usually. Ablation can treat atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, but can also treat other conduction abnormalities, such as wolf-parkinson-white (WPW) syndrome, which involves an abnormal electrical connection between the atria and the ventricles of the heart. Read more...
It varies. Catheter ablation is available for many different types of arrhythmias - ventricular tachycardia, svt, as well as atrial fibrillation. They are all a bit different in technique as well as risks/success rates. Read more...
It's Versatile. Ablation is great for a lot of different kinds of heart rhythms. Tens of thousands of ablations are done every year and the majority to substantial success. Read more...
Multiple conditions. Ablation is used to treat many different cardiac rhythm problems, both in the upper and lower chambers of the heart. It is safe and highly effective. Many patients may be cured of their rhythm problems with ablation. Read more...