What will a colonrectal surgeon do for internal hemorrhoids? What types of treatment?

Surgery, or not. We all have hemorrhoids. Unfortunately, in some of us, hemorrhoidal tissue can become inflamed and/or bleed. Internal hemorrhoids tend to bleed. The treatments are either local nonoperative therapy, ligating with rubber bands, or operation. Make sure you see a good CR surgeon. Good news is: your problem has a solution. .

Related Questions

Would a colonrectal surgeon be able to tell if my prostate was enlarged when she completed a digital rectal exam and/or andoscopy while searching for internal hemorrhoids?

Yes. While they may not routinely focus on the prostate portion of the exam, it would be something they could feel with the digital exam. Prostate size is not sufficiently visualized with anoscopy. There are folds of colon tissue that move out of the way with the finger test but sometimes obscure the anoscopy visualization. Since they don't focus on the prostate, though, they may not wish to comment. Read more...

My husband has had hemorrhoids in the past and now appears to have a fissure. Should he see a colorectal surgeon or his primary?

Colorectal surgeon. Anal fissure disease and hemorrhoids are the specialty of the colin and rectal surgeon. They have many tools to deal with these problems based on the findings. There is a directory of colon and rectal specialists on my website at www.Colonandrectalsurgery.Com. Read more...
Colorectal surgeon. Colorectal surgeons are the experts in anorectal disease. Fissures an be treated both medically or surgically. Read more...
See Primary. Hemorrhoids and fissures are usually treated initially with conservative therapy - high fiber diet, lots of water intake daily, daily activity (walking). Other medications can be tried such as mineral oil, stool softeners, witch hazel... All of these things can be done by your primary doctor. When /If these fail...then you will need to see a surgeon, Most of the time, these things work well. Read more...

Is a colorectal surgeon or proctologist needed for hemorrhoids?

Yes. General surgeons, colorectal surgeons proctologists are all trained to do hemorrhoids. Ask your family doctor , will advise you whom to see, . Read more...
Sometimes. Certainly a colorectal surgeon/proctologist (the latter being an older term but are the same thing) would be appropriate to correctly make the diagnosis and offer suggestions for improvement and hopefully avoiding surgery. Although, a colorectal surgeon likes to operate, as a whole, most of us would prefer conservative management most of the time, . Read more...

Can there be an oral treatment for internal hemorrhoids?

Sure. To reduce the swelling of internal hemorrhoids, you can take fiber therapy or stool softeners to keep your stool soft. Both are over the counter (colace, benefiber, etc) hemorrhoids are aggravated by straining and hard stools. External disease or symptoms such as burning, itching can be treated with witch hazel locally and sitz baths with epsom salts. Read more...

I have internal hemorrhoids but it appears one is becoming "external". What is treatment? I can actually push it back in but it doesn't want to stay

Hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are normal veins that can become enlarged, uncomfortable, or bleed with constipation. See a General Surgeon who performs hemorrhoid treatment procedures or a Colon-rectal Surgery specialist to see what you have & what your treatment options are. Read more...

What would be a highly effective internal hemorrhoids treatment?

Variable. It depends on size and location of the hemorrhoids. Prevention at home by avoiding constipation & avoid straining at toilet. Banding in the office for smaller internal hemorrhoids. Surgical options are hemorrhoid removal or hemorrhoid stapling procedures for larger hemorrhoids that may be both internal and external hemorrhoids. Read more...

Is there a radical treatment without surgery for internal hemorrhoids. Thanks?

Lots of options, but. "healing" depends on whether the original cause for hemorrhoids persists. Have you been straining at stool, have rectal dysfunction, perform an activity that increases pelvic engorgement with blood or increases pelvic pressure (heavy lifting, prolonged sitting, etc.)? Have your hemorrhoids been surgically or medically managed (& with otc or prescription drugs)? Are you sure they're hemorrhoids? Read more...