I have been having twinges in my left breast. Have had mammo, ultrasound & mri. All normal. Breast tissue dense. Concerned about breast cancer. What followup do you recommend? Tests were done last August.

Twinges. First it is great news that all of the testing has been normal to this point. I know it is frustrating not having an answer about the cause of the twinges. I would imagine repeating the mammogram in 3-6 months would be reasonable. If there is an early breast cancer (which there doesn't seem to be) you would be catching it early, when it's very treatable. Would need more info about twinges... .

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Mammogram, ct, MRI and ultrasound tests for breast cancer - what is best?

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What do you suggest if my mom has breast cancer and after some biopsy's and an MRI this of spreading to the left breast or towards the liver?

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Could dense breast tissue mean you must have breast cancer?

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