How can you distinguish between bacterial and viral conjunctivitis in babies?

Most are viral. most conjunctivitis (pink eye) is viral or allergic. The whites of the eyes are red with clear or mucous discharge. In bacterial conjunctivitis, there is little redness and there usually are not cold symptoms. In addition, there is often a thick, yellow pus discharge from the eye.

Related Questions

Bacterial vs viral conjunctivitis appearance?

Pus and edema. Bacterial conjunctivitis is not common in adults but occurs in children more often. I usually will have much more swelling, pus in the cul de sac, and much crusting and debris. Viral conjunctivitis is often bilateral, makes the eyes red all over, and has a clear to yellowish secretion but not pus (which is cloudy white). Your ophthalmologist can make this distinction and given you the best rx. Read more...

Bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, how can I tell?

Bacterial. In general, bacterial conjunctivitis will present with purulent discharge that occurs at the lid margins and in the corner of the eye. The discharge is generally thick and yellow/green/white. Read more...

Is bacterial conjunctivitis more contagious than viral conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis. No, viral conjunctivitis is more contagious than bacterial conjunctivitis. Bacterial conjunctivitis tends not to be contagious unless the surface of the eye is damaged. Read more...

How contagious is viral conjunctivitis in comparison to bacterial conjunctivitis?

Infections of the. conjunctiva, whether by virus or bacteria, are usually transmitted by direct contact. The infectious agent is not aerosolized thus it is is transported by either fluid or mucous. Read more...