My two year old was born w/ congenital heart disease. He's been rolling his eyes back abnormally at random. Like its uncontrollable. Is this normal!?

Unrelated. I can think of no process that puts the two issues together. CHD is a rather common birth condition and includes a number of abnormalities. The eye rolling suggests something involving the brains control of the eye muscles, a totally separate part of the body. You need to see the kids doc and have them sort this out.
See your doctor. Eye rolling could be a form of seizure. Probably unrelated to the heart, but it needs to be evaluated. If possible, try to get an episode of the eye rolling on video so the doctor can see what is going on.

Related Questions

Is a 2 year old with congenital heart disease (repaired coarctation) more susceptible to myocarditis? 5th disease is going round his nursery..

Uncommon. 5th disease is very common but its complications are uncommon. Due to his condition, it may be prudent if possible to keep him out and final alternate child care till there are no more cases in his room. Coarctation repair done early should not lead to any myocardial damage or dysfunction, just as aFYI. Read more...
Not more susceptible. If he had an isolated coarctation of the aorta then he is at no greater risk. Some babies with complex types of CHD also have related immune issues which would put them at greater risk - this is not usually the case with a "simple" coarctation. Read more...

Is congenital heart disease correlated with age? Are older people more at risk with congenital heart disease, if so, how can it be prevented?

Congenital . Congenital heart disease is a broad category that includes all heart conditions that are present at birth. Some are quite minor, but others are very complicated and associated with very high risk throughout life. Generally, cardiovascular conditions are associated with increasing risk as people age and this is also true of the congenital heart conditions. Also keep in mind that people with congenital heart disease are also at risk for acquired heart conditions like coronary artery disease. In the modern era, it is increasingly common for people with complicated congenital heart disease to live long and full lives. The best thing to do to prevent problems later in life is to see an expert in the care of adults with congenital heart disease. These experts are typically located at large referral centers, such as university hospitals. Read more...
No. I think this is a definition issue. Congenital means "from birth", and most congenital issues are caught nearer to birth, especially major ones that either cause blue lips and gums, or failure to grow properly. Sometimes an issue like a small hole between chambers of the heart goes undetected, and is found later on a cardiac work up for other reasons. But issues like that start from birth. Read more...
No. Congenital means "present at birth". So an adult cannot "develop" a congenital heart defect. Read more...

What is the percentage of oxygen is needed by a congenital heart disease patient? This patient is 3 month old.

O2 sat. Depends on the patients oxygen saturation, normal saturation is greater than 94%, however chd patients can compensate for lower values. Read more...
Above 80. If a cyanotic heart lesion cannot be repaired yet, saturations are acceptable over 80. Sometimes if there are no good options for surgery due to size or other risk factors, upper 70's are tolerated. In the usa most will have sats in the mid 80s before complete repair. Read more...

How does a baby with congenital heart disease effect the family its born into?

As any Baby.. Any new born baby brings joy and stress to their new parents and family. You do not mention what type of congenital heart disease, as they vary in severity from very mild to very severe. The level of care an impact to the family dynamics will be affected depending on this. Surround yourself with a good base of support and a medical team to care for the medical aspect. Best of luck to you. Read more...

Please let me know if there is hope for children born with congenital heart disease?

Yes. Both short term and long term outcomes depend on the exact type of congenital heart disease. The great majority of children with congenital heart disease will go on to live a normal or near normal life, even if they require open heart surgery. Almost every child born with congenital heart disease was options for successful care. Best care is delivered at congenital heart centers. Read more...

How does a baby with congenital heart disease affect the family its born in too?

Depends. Some problems are relatively simple to fix and after repair will be just fine and require little additional concern. More severe conditions may require multiple surgical procedures and require the allocation of major financial and emotional resources with expected increased stress levels. And some children will never be ok or will die. Good luck. Read more...
Prenatal diagnosis. Allows parents time to process information about the specific chd & what will happen at delivery. Parents grieve for the loss of the healthy baby they expected, but they often go through the stages of grief at different rates, & may revert to an earlier stage of grief. They also have to re-organize family life around their child's needs. Therapists, clergy, & prenatal counselors can help. Read more...

If I was born with a congenital heart disease are there any precautions I should take before going on long flights?

Depends on type. If you have a "cyanotic" congenital heart disease, you may need to wear oxygen during the flight. If your room air oxygen saturation (your doctor can check this) is <95%, you may need oxygen, and if <92%, you probably will.(managing passengers with respiratory disease planning air travel: bts recommendations. British thoracic society standards of care committee, thorax. 2002:57(4):289.). Read more...
DVT precautions. If your heart disease causes a problem with circulation in your legs, then you might want to consider wearing compression stockings to help prevent getting a deep vein thrombosis or a blood clot in your legs that can break off and cause real problems. This is definitely something to chat with your doctor about. Read more...

Could you suggest treatment for congenital heart disease with atrial septial defect for a man aged 39?

Depending on size. Treatment of (ASD) is dependent on its size, whether there is significant flow across it, and the location within the atrial septum. If it's a significant defect then treatment is either surgical with open heart surgery, or transcatheter device closure if the defect meets the required criteria. If it's a small defect with no right heart chamber dilatation then typically no treatment is needed. Read more...