Would urine epinephrine be elevated with panic attacks?

Definitely possible. urine epinephrine is not that helpful when it comes to diagnosing adrenal gland disorders given the short half life of the hormone. Anxiety does lead to epinephrine production and false urine elevation. In a panic attack it could very well be elevated.

Related Questions

Can elevated epinephrine and panic attack symptoms cause cognition problems and severe restlessness?

Well... Epinephrine (more commonly known as adrenaline) can definitely cause restlessness ... As its one of the chemical signals sent by the brain in the "flight or fight" response. As well, panic disorder can cause alterations in cognition ... Although without knowing more about you, it's impossible to say to what extent. Hope that helps! Read more...

Is it possible with panic attacks to give yourself an adrenaline rush or head rish by just thinking that it is gonna happen?

Yes. Thoughts can trigger the occurrence of physiological changes in the body. This can include having a 'fight or flight' sympathetic/emergency response when you are thinking about having a panic attack. Adrenaline/epinephrine and related chemical messengers cause for increase in heart rate, changes in breathing pattern, and more. Treatment includes breaking this vicious cycle (cognitive behavioral). Read more...
Yes. That could be called: in vitro exposure. It can actually be a very powerful tool. If one can imagine a situation and have a panic attack and then, just allow the anxiety to wash over until it naturally goes away, one can eventually rid themselves of the anxiety. It is part of the exposure & response prevention paradigm and is very effective. If a person cam do it, they can avoid needing medicines. Read more...
Yes. That could be called: in vitro exposure. It can actually be a very powerful tool. If one can imagine a situation and have a panic attack and then, just allow the anxiety to wash over until it naturally goes away, one can eventually rid themselves of the anxiety. It is part of the exposure & response prevention paradigm and is very effective. If a person cam do it, they can avoid needing medicines. Read more...

Can panic cause elevated epinephrine in urine?

YES. Epineprine, adrenalin is the cause. Do consult with a Urologist. Best Wishes, Arthur Hoffman,MD.FAPS,FIPS. Read more...

I have panic attacks. I have. 5mg Xanax (alprazolam) pills (which really help), but is there a way I can burn off the horrible residual adrenaline? A brisk walk?

Exercise & Relax. When you get the "fight or flight" response to stressful events it is helpful to exercise or to do the "relaxation response." both of these will assist in significantly decreasing that stressed feeling that stems from adrenaline, cortisol, and increased blood pressure and heart rate. For more information on the relaxation response, see: http://www.Massgeneral.Org/bhi/basics/rr.Aspx. Read more...
Caution . Heavy exercise induces lactic acid. In some but not all patients, Lactic Acid induces panic... That is why panics and asthmatics both should exercise slowly and not heavily. Zoloft, effexor, (venlafaxine) Paxil , Imipramine and Klonopin are all effective in treating panic disorder. Have you asked your md for those? Read more...

My urine pH is 5.What are the causes? It there any link between it and panic attacks?

No,cover with PCP. A renal consult might be wise since the causes could range from nothing to worry about to something that needs to be looked into now. Pcp=primary care physician which is another way of saying family doctor. Read more...

Could panic attacks cause excess levels of catecholamines in urine tests?

Temporary, maybe. 24 hour urine tests for catecholamines are checking for epinephrine, norepinephrine, & other compounds that can be produced by catecholamine-secreting tumors called pheochromocytomas. Panic attacks alone might temporarily raise these levels, but not in sustained fashion like one of these tumors can. When present, pheochromocytomas can cause anxiety and panic attacks and raise urine catecholamines. Read more...