Is it common to return to sports after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

With care. 21yo male w. concern return to sport post-surgery for neurogenic Thoacic Outlet Syndrome, TOS. Aircraft mechanics, house painters & major league pitchers prone to TOS. Repetitive overhead work overdevelops muscles of inferior clavicle/scapula draw while superior trapezius, ST, loses mass & tone; leading to costoclavicular-clavicular dimension closure w. abduction. Solution: shrug exercises of ST.

Related Questions

Do patients return to sports after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

They can. Yes, they certainly can, especially at a recreational level. Any surgery can effect an athlete at a high competitive level, depending on the demands of the sport and the surgery that was performed. For instance, if you're a pitcher is the major or minor leagues, it may be difficult to return to your presurgical velocity due to surgical insult and change in mechanics. . Read more...

Does surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome have good results? Do people return to normal activity?

It can be fine. You need a competent surgeon and clear evidence that this is the correct diagnosis and no other option is available. The surgery can be very beneficial. Read more...

What is the long term prognosis after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Improvement. You, the cause, the surgeon and the surgery, as well as chance ( complications or not) determine any surgical result. What you can control in terms of optimizing your outcome is to follow instructions, including notifying your doc of any unexpected symptoms. Eat properly, get plenty of rest. Worrying too much impacts health and recovery. Relax,allow time to heal. See http://tinyurl.com/ozj9str. Read more...

How is the long term outlook after having surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

Varies. Paul, docs can only give a prediction, not a guarantee, about the goals of any treatment. You and your surgeon felt surgery was a better option than not having surgery. Everybody responds differently to surgery but the goal is improvement. After all, if we wanted to hurt people for a living we could have gone to law school or been bankers. Talk to your surgeon again about your concerns. Read more...
Nerve damage? It really depends upon how much nerve damage there was before they did the surgery. If there is not permanent nerve damage then you can expect a full recovery. It may also take many months to know for sure. If you were having a lot of nerve pain and numbness, once the nerve is decompressed with the surgery it can take a while to recover. Read more...
Variable. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is due to compression of the brachial plexus, or nerves to the arm. The longer the compression, the less likely this will lead to complete resolution of symptoms, but generally will give some degree of relief. Discuss the options with your surgeon. Read more...

Does surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome have a good prognosis?

Variable. Initial success rates are 91 to 93 percent. With time, success appears to wane. At 10 years, the success rate among all approaches ranges from 64 percent to 71 percent. Depends on comorbid conditions like depression, cause of injury and preop response to blocks. Thanks for trusting HealthTap! Read more...
Thoracic oultlet syn. If anybody fails the conservative treatment with physical therapy, they may need surgical correction to salvage the nerves. Once the pressure is relieved the symptoms shoud improve, that is a good prognosis right? Read more...

How are moderns results for surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

TSO is caused by- -pressure from outside of the nerves, it is not a neurological disease. Just like CTS is caused from pressure from outside of the nerve, not a neurological disease intrinsic to the median nerve. . Read more...

Does surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome have a good long term prognosis?

Good with. a correct diagnosis , if it is due to compression of brachial nerves between scalene muscles and first rib , will have satisfactory out come , as they are peripheral nerves ( as they regenerate ) Read more...

Is there a chance that surgery won't help neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome? If so how often does this happen?

Yes. Unfortunately, it is possible that it will not help but that goes for any surgery. The question is best answered by the surgeon himself. Read more...