How often does dysplastic nevus turn into melanoma? 10% 20%, etc... thanks

25% We remove them if we suspect they are malignant. There is rarely any benefit from removal of benign "dysplastic" nevi. All recent studies indicate that your omega 3 is a waste of money. Aspirin may reduce the risk of skin cancers, including melanoma. The dose is 81mg (baby aspirin). If your aspirin is coated, throw it away. It must be uncoated to be effective. Get CHEWABLE baby aspirin. Can swallo.

Related Questions

What is dysplastic nevus as compared to melanoma?

Melanoma. Remember, any mole (pigmented spot or growth) that undergoes a significant change in size, shape, or color — or that causes symptoms of itching or bleeding — should be suspected of being a melanoma. Read more...
You have asked... ...One of the most controversial questions in dermatology. One faction believes that dysplastic nevi are precursors of melanomas, and should be excised before they become melanomas. Another faction believes dysplastic nevi are benign moles that never become melanomas. There is evidence to support both arguments. Read more...

Which disease has more severe consequences dysplastic nevus or melanoma?

Melanoma. Melanoma is a life-threatening malignancy of melanocytes, pigmented skin cells. Dysplastic nevus may progress to melanoma. Since both of these are usually asymptomatic early in the course, and since melanoma is curable if treated early, routine skin checks are quintessential. Read more...
Melanoma. A dysplastic nevus, unlike a melanoma, is not a true cancer. It is best thought of as a pre-cancer, a possible precursor to melanoma that with time may possibly be able to turn into a true cancer like melanoma. Read more...
Melanoma. Dysplastic nevi are still benign lesions. People who have had them are at a slightly higher risk of melanoma than other people. Melanoma is however malignant and can be fatal if untreated. Read more...

What is the likelihood of a dysplastic nevus turning into melanoma? I can't find any relative data online

Depends. It depends on several factors, like the total # of dysplastic nevi, nevi size, patient age, family history, etc. The reported annual transformation rate of any single mole into melanoma is ?1 in 200,000 in people 60. Check out this paper by Tsao H, et al, in Archives of Dermatology in 2003: The Transformation Rate of Moles (Melanocytic Nevi) Into Cutaneous Melanoma. Read more...

Dysplastic nevus, or atypical moles, and they are benign lesions that resemble early melanoma, and about 1 in 10 million americans willmelanoma, what to do?

Watch carefully. Dysplastic nevi are potentially serious in that they can convert to infiltrating melanoma. In children with spitz nevus, they look malignant but never convert. In patients with neurofibromatosis there is a high incidence of dysplastic nevi and since many are present they are watched for changes in shape, darkening in color or redness around the lesion suggesting that they are converting. Read more...

Pathology moderate atypical dysplastic nevus, recommend further excision. Is this cancer/melanoma?

Not yet. It may develop into a malignancy but is not yet. The borders may be incompletely excused, or te pathologist may feel that a wide enough clear margin has not been achieved. Read more...
No. At least not in the portion that was examined. Try to get a couple of pathologists to look at it. And having had this lesion, you are at greatly increased risk for melanomas elsewhere. Keep an eye on yourself. Read more...
It is not cancer. However, these lesions can be come cancerous and based of clinical aspect, family history and location a dermatologist needs to examin you on a regular basis, two ro three times a year to see if they becaome suspicious. Read more...

I get yearly skin screenings and will continue to do so. My question is about a previous excised mole. It was a moderate-severe atypical dysplastic nevus. I know having atypical moles can be a sign of increased chance of melanoma. I've also read that ma

Try to be concise. Unfortunately this format is like Twitter - you have limited characters for your questions. Try to be a bit better about shortening the provided information so that you can focus on your question(s) of interest. Good luck. Read more...
Low risk. As long as the atypical nevus was excised with negative margins (normal skin at all edges), then you should be fine. Lower your risk of developing a new problem somewhere else by avoiding excessive sun exposure, or by using frequent applications of sunscreen if you must be out in the sun. Read more...

Black spot under tongue of 5 y/o. Prev biopsy of toe lesion dysplastic nevus. No fam history of melanoma. Gp/ent rec biopsy after watch 2mos. Ok wait more?

Definitive diagnosis. Is made by the biopsy. If the recommendation is for biopsy - do not delay. Hopefully, it is nothing. In he event it is something, you need to find out. Read more...
No. No... If your ENT recommends a repeat biopsy within a certain amount of time- follow the recommendations. Dysplastic nevus is a precancerous type lesion. Dysplasia indicates the cell architecture has morphed towards the spectrum of cancer and can definitely become a cancerous lesion. Follow all recs closely as any cancer is better treated when found early. Read more...