Should someone with a history of hemolytic uremic syndrome as a child follow up with a nephrologist as a adult? Even if they're not having problems

Not necessarily. If your primary care doctor has checked your kidney function and it is normal then you probably do not need to see a nephrologist. If there is any residual kidney damage from the HUS then it would be good to see a nephrologist. Many people recover fully from HUS and do not need ongoing care by a kidney specialist.
Yes . blood pressure need to be monitored together with kidney function test. So the answer is yes.

Related Questions

What kind of doctor sees somebody for hemolytic uremic syndrome?

Different docs. Foe successful diagnosis and treatment of hus a patient needs to see a nephrologist (kidney specialist) and a hematologist (blood specialist) usually. Read more...

How come hemolytic-uremic syndrome very damaging to the kidneys, and what can I do to prevent it?

See below. Hemolytic uremic syndrome usually develops in response to infection, especially toxigenic e coli. The disease process leads to clogging of capillaries in the kidney and destroying the blood filtration process. Avoiding is by protecting yourself from infection. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hemolytic-uremic-syndrome/ds00876. Read more...

Why do some people get hemolytic uremic syndrome and others don't?

EHEC with STX. Hemoyltic uremic syndrome (hus) is associated with infections involving entero-hemorrhagic e coli (ehec). This results in bloody diarrhea and hus since this bacteria produces a special group of toxins (verotoxin or shiga toxins- aka stx). The most representative strain of this type of e coli is referred to as o157:h7, responsible for several deadly outbreaks in recent years around the world. Read more...
See below. Hus is a serious disease, some causes are genetic, some due to certain bacterial products in meat, like e colii infected hamburgers or raw meat patients can develop severe anemia and kidney failure so not everyone gets it. Read more...
Certain risks. Include younger children, elevated initial white blood cell count and, especially the use of antibiotics early in the illness with enterohemorrhagic e .Coli strains. Read more...
Immune system quirks. The same reason only 1/200 people with untreated strep A get rheumatic fever or only 5% of those who were infected by poliovirus developed paralysis. When the bodies immune system creates antibodies to an invading germ, that antibody sometimes gets confused and attacks human tissues as well. There are some human tissue patterns that are more susceptible than others but we can't predict it. Read more...

Can I be vaccinated against hemolytic-uremic syndrome?

No. It is usually caused after an gastro-intestinal disorder characterized by diarrhea and vomiting. A common cause is from contaminated meat. Other infections can lead to hus as well. Some medications including chemo therapeutic agents, quinine containing compounds and Cyclosporine has been implicated. Read more...
No. Simply hope you do not get it. Eat your meat well-cooked, wash your vegetables, and hope for the best. Read more...

What's a hemolytic-uremic syndrome?

HUS is... An illness with hemolysis (breaking apart of red blood cells) and uremia (kidney failure) and sometimes with central nervous system symptoms. It is mostly a complication of infection with enterohemorrhagic e. Coli (usually o157) that begins with diarrhea that becomes bloody, significant abdominal pain and little fever. The risk of hus is really increased by antibiotic use during the diarrhea. Read more...
HUS... Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (hus) is a disorder that usually occurs when an infection in the digestive system produces toxic substances that destroy red blood cells, causing kidney injury. Hus often begins with vomiting and diarrhea, which may be bloody. Within a week, the person may become weak and irritable. Persons with this condition may urinate less than normal. Urine output may almost stop. Read more...

What is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (hus)?

Toxic Kidney Injury. Hus is a disorder that usually occurs when an infection in the GI tract (such as e.Coli o157:h7) produces toxic substances that damage blood vessel lining, cause hemolytic anemia and lead to kidney failure. It is a serious infectious complication that can actually be made worse with antibiotics. Read more...
Kidney disease. Caused by break down of red blood cells (hemolysis) that is caused by minute clots ( microthrombi )in capillaries in kidneys and other organs including brain. The resultant blockage of kidney and brain circulations cause kidney failure and seizure respectively. Not all cases have obviously diagnosable reason but an infection with certain kind of e.Coli bacteria can cause it and that can be fatal. Read more...