Why wouldn't most dentists use a one piece dental implant?

Flexability. From the restorative aspect--and this is the most realistic aspect as you are trying to replace a tooth or teeth -a one piece implant is severely restrictive and may result in long-term disappointment. Allowing for the variability in angulation and the height changes makes the 2 piece far better. Also, we can change abutments over time if needed,and this allows for adding other implants over time.
Restorative Options. It's because most dentists want to have options when choosing the abutment for the final restoration. One piece systems work well for some circumstances, but lack the versatility of two piece systems. In addition, implants with multiple restorative options can be used for both fixed and removable prosthetics.
Dental Implant. One piece dental implants are very convenient in select cases. The major criteria is how dense is the bone and how tight (secure) will the implant be immediately after placement. Two piece implant systems are used to minimize the direct pressure and torque on the implant while healing occurs. Any micro movement of the implant during the first 2 - 4 weeks will cause it to fail.
Good question. One piece implants are extremely underutilized in implant dentistry. One piece implants are becoming no longer fashionable due to the increased technical difficulty in terms of surgical placement, patient compliance and restoration.

Related Questions

If a dental implant costs a dentist about one hundred dollars why is it that the surgical procedure is three thousand with abutment?

Labor. The cost of labor(staff )and behind the scenes costs such as overhead, lab and imbursement of the surgeon for his skills,equipment Also future followup appointment costs are generally included in that figure. Read more...
Hidden costs. are also a consideration like malpractice insurance, costs of imaging systems, and other things that go behind the scenes to make that implant possible. Read more...
Just a wild guess. Because dental school is more expensive then an average house and practice expenses (overhead) and malpractice insurance, etc. Read more...
Many costs. First,any implant from a reputable company costs well more that $100.Also,the components involved to place it are very costly (Surgical drill,multiple burs,torque driver, etc).These will need to be properly cleaned and sterilized.Other instruments needed to clean-out and prepare site.Possible grafting needed. Most importantly the knowledge and skill to properly and successfully place it.Good Luck. Read more...
Many Other Costs. The implants cost more than $100, but that's not the point. Fees encompass so many other costs and also include a profit for the office. You can use your analogy for almost everything that has a price on it, but in the end the result is the same: if you want it, you'll pay for it. The choice is yours. Read more...

What is your own additional parts charge when a person has a screw retained dental implant vs. Cemented one (dentist will not be specific)?

Variable. Lots of variables. If you're unhappy with your dentist and his explanations, consider another dentist. Sounds like you already have a trust issue. Read more...
About the same. Replacing screws for a screw retained implant prosthesis and the cost of re-cementing a cemented one are about the same. Temporary cement should be used as an implant prosthesis should always be retrievable, just as a screw retained is by it's definition. So whether there is a cost to re-cement or replace a screw(s), the cost balance out. To be more specific, figure on about $100/ screw plus labor. Read more...
Trust your dentist. Dentists choose screw retained implants vs cemented implants for a variety of reasons that benefit the long term prognosis of your restoration and implants. The fee difference is nominal if there is any difference at all. The most important thing is that you are seeing a dentist that has experience in restoring dental implants. All the best. Read more...
Same fee. Whether it is a screw retained crown or cemented crown there is no difference in my fees. It is usually up to the restorative dentist to decide which option is best suited to your needs. Read more...
20% more. A screw-retained typically requires a custom component to be waxed and cast. In addition custom components more expensive than their stock components and more lab work is required which increase the cost. Read more...
Variable. Cement and screw-retained implant restorations have different indications. Your dentist will determine which is most appropriate for your individual situation. Read more...

My dentist is too busy to answer question. Can I floss adjacent teeth starting the day after having a one stage dental implant surgical operation?

Unfortunate. It is so unfortunate that your provider has no time to talk to you. Flossing should not be a problem as long as you don't disturb the surgical site. This issue as well as many others should be a part of your post op instructions. Make it so. Read more...
Floss gently. Flossing is key component of implant home care. Don't aggressively floss around the area and disturb the health tissue. Gently floss the areas adjacent to the implant site. Don't use a water pic this will cause blunting of the supporting soft tissue and can actually push bacteria down into the implant site causing perio implantitis. Read more...
Highly Recommended. It is highly recommended to use unwaxed tape or implant-specific floss. Make sure to floss at least every night, though ideally after every meal. Read more...
I would wait. Granted I appreciate your wanting to floss but due to the surgical site still healing (possibly with sutures) I would not floss directly around that area for a week at least. You still want to gently brush the area but please wait on flossing the area. Read more...

HELP PLEASE white thick coating in mouth after dentist placed a pivot inside one of my molars that he drilled (dental implant) the white coat some of it can easily be removed with teeth and it has a powdery consistency. Should I be worried?

Unsure. An implant is a metallic fixture that is placed in the mouth to substitute for a tooth root that has been completely removed, not a "pivot" that is placed into existing tooth structure. Your best course of action is to return to your Dentist to review your concerns. Read more...
IDK. There is no way for us to know exactly what is going on with what you describe. My best guess is that perhaps some bond grafting material has leaked out, which may be of no consequence. However, you need to call the dentist who performed the surgery and ask whether or not he/she feels you should be seen for an evaluation. . Read more...

What does it mean for a dentist to flush out a dental implant?

Not a common term. Dental implants need hygiene, just like teeth. Brushing and flossing, and even proxy brush around them stimulates the tissue, as well as eliminate bacterial accumulation on food deposits. Flushing could be the use of a oral irrigator like a waterpik. Still too strong a pressure of the flow of water can damage the tissue and dry bacteria deeper than you would want. Implants succeed if cleaned. Read more...
Clean & Disinfect. Sounds like your implant has a problem, probably will infection, loss of bone attachment, or plaque/food accumulation. In these cases, the area around the implant will be gently opened, the area will be cleaned, & then it will be "flushed" with an antiseptic and/or antibiotic. This is no different than what would be done with any other area of the body which is infected and needs to be cleaned. Read more...
Periimplantitis. When a dental implant restoration suffers from periodontal infection, or there is crestal bone resorption which creates a residual defect, the "pocket" around the implant is often irrigated with antimicrobial solutions such as chlorhexadine. If this is in the context of what your dentist is prescribing, then it may fit. Read more...
Infected implants. "flush out" is not a common term. Probably there is some evidence of infection around the dental implant and flushing out means irrigating the implant site with an antibiotic rinse or an antimicrobial rinse. Read more...
Irrigation. The phrase maybe what dentists refer to as "irrigation" with an antimicrobial such as chlorhexidine. Read more...
Not medical term. I am not sure what is meant by this exactly since it is not a medical term. That being said, he is most likely referring to rinsing the site with saline and possibly antibiotic solution. Sounds like you are experiencing a problem possibly with bone loss, infection etc. Just ask your dentist what he is referring to. Read more...
Infection. Usually there is an infection in the surrounding gum tissue. Bathe dentist takes specific medicaments and flushes out the gum tissue to improve the health of the area. Read more...
Flushing implant. Ask the dentist the direct question--what are you doing it for? When anything is "flushed" it implies "something" (pus, debris, etc) needs to be removed. If it has just been placed, the implant may not be doing well, and the idea is to clean it out. If it's been there and already has a tooth on it, "flushing" may mean that some of the implant is exposed and the tissue around it is pocketed. Read more...
Clean. When the dentist 'flushes out' a dental implant, he or she is essentially irrigating the implant site with a special medicine to remove bacteria and other debris around the implant. This helps clean it and prevent any further bone loss if some has already occurred. Read more...

I am now convinced that a dental implant and crown at $5, 000 is for wealthy people since dentists know the great majority of ins. Cos. Do not pay. Hmm?

Ferrari. The cost of implants, materials and lab fees consume a large part of the overall costs. Don't blame dentists if the insurance companies don't pay for these procedures. i'd like a Ferrari. Too bad i can't afford it. Read more...
Believe what u wish. Many insurance companies pay for dental care... it just depends on the plan and the premiums. Unfortunately the treatment you seek is not inexpensive. A removable prosthetic is an option... millions of others wear them. No one has ever said that implants are not worth the money. Decide what is important to you and what you can afford... then you can chose the treatment which fits your desires. Read more...
Aren’t just for rich. Obviously, costs vary greatly depending on your needs and desires. Check the treatment plan and fees in the dental school near you. Read more...

I was wondering is it possible to change dentist while having dental implant surgery?

Yes but Why? Trust is the most important factor in achieving the good outcome of your treatment. Perhaps the communication between you and your dentist could improve with having to go over the treatment plan to settle your difference. Was it the diagnostic process? Or the outcome of the surgery? Many times we should wait for the end result before passing out judgement. Be patient and speak out your concern. Read more...
Sure,carefully. Not sure of exact question, but you are the consumer and you must feel comfortable. Generally once something is started you should follow through, but if you have concerns, then step back and reconsider. See the specialist - the Prosthodontist - for advice. Then make your decision. It needs to feel right. It IS all about you. Good Luck. Read more...
At any time. However, if you want to change dentists/oral surgeon during a course of your implant surgery, you may have to pay the first dentist for the treatment to date. Hope it helps. Read more...
It is your mouth. If you don't feel comfortable with your current provider then search for one that you feel you can communicate with better. Make sure you have all the treatment records to help your new provider continue the correct treatment. This will help the provider take over the treatment planning without any issues. Establishing a relationship between the provider and the patient is key to treatment success. Read more...
Yes. Yes, if you need or want to change then do so. Just make sure you get all the information about the implant that was placed so that the new dentist can pick up where the other left off. No worries. Read more...

What kind of follow up do I need after dental implant surgery? Do I need to go to the dentist to have them checked?

That . That depends. Was it simple then just normal follow up. Or if implant was done with more complex things like grafting then more intense follow up. Your dentist will monitor all this for you. Read more...
Take . Take your prescribed meds, no strenuous physical activities, no brushing on area of surgery for 1 week, rinse with salt-water or peridex (chlorhexidine gluconate). Followup visit 7-10 days later. http://www.betterlivingdentistry.com/pre-amp-post-op-instructions-26.html#4. Read more...
- Yes they usually need to be checked for proper healing and proper integration with bone prior to being loaded. Read more...
Yes. You should be seen about 1 week after the surgery. If all is normal at that time, then again when the next phase is to begin. This may be anywhere from 12 weeks to 6 months. Any problems in between these times -- be seen for evaluation. Read more...
Dental implants. It's highly recommended to have follow up visit with the surgeon who has placed the implant. Reasons include: -monitor healing process -address any issues that might not be viewed as nomad healing -remove sutures if any was placed -adjust flipper, bite, retainer, etc. That could influence the healing -expose implant if it's submerged -surgically correct tissue if needed prior to final restoration. Read more...
Follow Up. You need follow up from the surgeon during the healing phase of the implant placement. Once the implant is restored your general dentist can check the implants on a routine basis at your hygience and recall appointments. They should be checked for any signs of bone or tissue loss just like your natural teeth. Read more...
Yes. You should see the dentist periodoically until the dentla implants are ready to be restored. Read more...
It depends. It is common to have a follow up visit about 1 week after implant surgery. This is especially true if sutures were placed. The success of the dental implants (i.e., whether or not they achieved successful integration in the bone) is not apparent for months later. It is at that time (which can vary) that a surgeon much recall you to assess the implants and determine if they are ready to restore. Read more...
Post op visits. We do a few short visits. The first is at about two weeks just for a "look see." the second visit is at least six weeks after the procedure when we take an x-ray to check the bone healing. Everyone is different. Patients with significant medical problems we see more often. I hope this helps. Read more...
Follow-up YES!!!! After surgery, you need to be seen within the first week to evaluate healing and possibly remove any stitches. After your initial follow-up, your dentist should see you every 4-6 weeks to check on the healing of the soft tissue and take an x-ray to make sure there are no bone healing problems. This will help ensure that the restoration of the implant can proceed as planned. Read more...
Implant follow -up. Follow -up largely depends on the number and location of the implant(s). I have a 1 week check, but give the patient a choice to return sooner if they feel they would like a check sooner. Then 1month 3month 4month check. Sooner if the patient has any concern. In more involved cases a next day visit is called for. Read more...

Have you ever done an immediate load dental implant? Also, are all your fellow dentists doing them on a daily basis? Yes, it depends on case selection.

Yes, possibly, and. yes it depends on case selection as you said... Read more...
No, possibly, and. it depends on the individual case as you said. Read more...
Not uncommon. However, patient selection, as well as surgical skill, experience and technique, influence the outcome of immediate load dental implant success. Read more...