My fathers grandmother, and my mothers mother, both had breast cancer, I am 40, should I be worried. Does it skip generations or is it off mom or dads?

Cancer lot of factor. Developing breast cancer is not just genetic there are lots of factors. But yes if there is a strong family history a person should be concerned. It depends on when your relatives had breast cancer. If many had breast cancer in their 40-50's then there should be some concern. Genetic Breast cancer can come from mom or dads side, due to autosomal dominant nature, difficult to tell regarding skip.

Related Questions

Mothers mom had pancreatic cancer at 72, dad had colon at 87, she had had lobular breast cancer at 54. I've had brca testing- negative. Am I at risk?

Doubt. With the negative BRCA tests, your risk of these is much lower. They may identify other genetic tumor markers for these as time goes on. Remember, the majority of colon cancer is found in persons without a family history for it. Read more...
Some risk. There is some risk even though you don't have the BRCA gene mutation. If your own parents, instead of your grandparents, had these diseases your risk would be greater. A geneticist can advise you better,however. Read more...
Not extra risk. Keep up surveillance like everybody else, and good luck. Read more...

If my father's mother has breast cancer. N her daughter, my aunt doesn't. So will I ever get breast cancer from her?? What r d chancues I will.??

Your risk of. developing breast cancer depends on a lot of things, family history being one of them. You will not contract breast cancer from your aunt, because it is not a communicable disease. Read more...

My father died from multiple myeloma at age 57 and my mother died from breast cancer at age 54, am I at risk too?

Cancer. First of all, there is no clear inheritance pattern in multiple myeloma. Second of all, majority of breast cancer is sporadic in nature and only 15 % or so cases are familial. Are there other family members either in your father and/or mother sides who also were diagnosed of having cancers? If there are- consider to see a genetician to calculate your risk and to update your screening test. Read more...

Mother has breast cancer at 53, her father had colon at 87, her paternal uncle had aml at 65 and her paternal cousin aml at 50. Hereditary?

Posible. If no other members of your family has breast or colon cancers then your parents has disease at random , not genetic etiology. Your uncle family has acute myeloid leukemia in two members in two generations , possibly genetic ( hereditary ) , may be have cebpa mutation or some thing else , you have to speak to the oncologist with patients permission and may need investigation. Read more...
Likely no. Most of your family members are developing their cancers later in life, and there is not an obvious pattern of inheritance from this limited amount of info. I'd talk about this with your doc and do a quick pedigree analysis. Modern techniques are revealing correlations that we couldn't see in the past. So a good history can be helpful to tease out any possible association. Read more...
Possibly. Rare genetic syndrome called li fraumeni. But could be just sporadic. I think it would be reasonable to do two things: 1) have a CBC done 2) consider meeting with a genetic counselor. Hope this helps. Read more...

My mom died because of breast cancer at age45 and my grandmother& aunt (side father) died of uterus cancer. I'm worried about myself. What should I do?

Establish. A doctor that you can see yearly for physical exams. Perform breast self exams. Yearly mammograms at age 40. Can ask your doctor about brca and have genetic testing. Be healthy. Eat healthy. Maintain a healthy weight. Exercise. Read more...
Follow your doctor's. Recommendation for cancer screening, even if don't have any symptoms. It is important to detect breast cancer and cervical cancer early. You should also get tested for any genetic disorders that might predispose you to develop cancers. Read more...

My mom has breast cancer and her mother had pancreatic. Should she test for palb2? I'm negative for it but she wasn't tested.

Probably not. We usually do tests to help us decide what to do. Your mother already has breast cancer and is being treated, so it wouldn't change her treatment. Pancreatic cancer is not associated with this mutation. Read more...
Need more info. PALB2 and to some degree BRCA2 mutations can increase the risk of pancreatic cancer (as well as obviously breast) but these cases may be unrelated. I would assume her oncologist is aware of this and has taken a good family history to see if further work up is needed. Is she still seeing a cancer doc? If so, she should ask him/her about it. If not, have her bring it up with her primary doc. Read more...

My aunt has breast cancer & also my mother.3 weeks ago my aunt did the genetic test &the results came negative. Does my mom has to do the test also?

Genetic testing. Depends on how many first (parent, sibling etc) and second degree relatives (aunts, grand parents) have cancer ; the type of cancer. If there are other female cancers in the family, then genetic counseling and testing may be indicated. Read more...
Reasonable choice. Significant family history (also check for uterine, ovarian, colon, prostate). Could have implications for you if positive on your mom. Read more...

My mother passed away from breast cancer also had a cousin on my fathers side had both breast removed because of cancer I have been having swelling?

See doctor. If you have not had routine breast cancer screening (mammograms and breast exams by a health care professional) you should have those. If your mother had breast cancer you may have a higher risk of breast cancer. If you notice any abnormality on a self breast exam, you need to see your doctor. Read more...
High-risk specialist. Your family history is worrisome (especially if your mother and cousin were premenopausal or there are other family members with breast ovarian, uterine, prostate, or colon cancers). You might want to see a specialist. If you are found to be at increased genetic risk, you may need more aggressive screening with an mri. For very high risk patients preventative drugs or surgery may be suggested. Read more...