Can you get acute bronchitus twice a year without it being chronic bronchitis?

YES. Many do, this is quite common in kids who are exposed to lots of respiratory illness in day care and school, as well as some adults.
Twice a year. 2 separate episodes of bronchitis would not be chronic bronchitis. You can be treated for isolated episodes. All the best.

Related Questions

24 wk pregnant. Non smoker. I get bronchitis each year for 1-2 weeks. This year cough x 9 weeks. I'm concerned about chronic bronchitis. Am I at risk?

Not likely. "Chronic bronchitis" refers to a long-term degeneration of lung function occurring in mostly older people and most often in smokers or former smokers. I presume you are relatively young as you are pregnant. Have you discussed your cough with your OB or Primary Care Physician? Read more...

28 yo. Never smoked. Teach young kids. I get bronchitis once a year in fall and cough mucus 3-4 weeks. Could it be chronic bronchitis? How to prevent?

Uri. Not necessarily a chronic bronchitis. Being in contact with small kids you are exposed to viruses and other germs contracted by kids. Probably it is a good option that you take the flu shot every year to minimize the risk of flu also. The cough sometimes stays for long time after we get any respiratory infection. . Read more...
Not Crhonic Bronch. The definition of chronic bronchitis is a productive cough with sputum lasting for three months for two consecutive years. You are probably experiencing acute viral bronchitis. Lasting four weeks is a little on the extreme side. You are exposed to kids and thus multiple viruses. Prevention is washing hands often and exposure occurs with hand to mouth transfer of the virus. Read more...

I'm 19yrs old and have never smoked, but grew up around it. I get chronic bronchitis and an upper respiratory infection every year and always have tro?

It sets you up forit. Children of smokers are 19 times more likely to develop COPD than children of non-smokers. Your best bet is to live without it and do the best you can. Read more...

Chronic bronchitis on a 1 year old boy?

Unusual. Consult with pulmonologist, about congenital diseases or lungs malformations. Read more...
Multiple causes. If your son has had multiple infections of his lungs in the last one year, he requires additional evaluation. Environmental smoke and pollution, the presence of allergies/asthma can be associated w chronic respiratory infections. In addition, reflux and aspiration, retained foreign body and immune defects are other causes to consider. Cystic fibrosis is less common in asia, but possible. Read more...

Is it dangerous for a 20 year old to have tachycardia and chronic bronchitis?

Bronchitis. Tachycardia is a sign that something else is wrong ;what is causing the rapid heart rate? Bronchitis that is chronic is certainly dangerous over a long period of time it can lead to permanent lung damage. If this is due to smoking please stop as soon as possible. Read more...

Did the chronic bronchitis cause my asthma? I had bronchitis for 3 months straight this year and asthma ever since. If yes, then how did this happen?

May be all asthma. Bronchitis lasting 3 months for one year is not chronic bronchitis. Without having all clinical data it is very difficult for me to determine what exactly you had for 3 months. Asthma may develop after infections of the bronchial tree, particularly after viral and certain bacterial infections. If you haven't yet, see an asthma specialist. Read more...

My 10 year old girl has chronic bronchitis. ..What to give her. ..Is it dangerous?

Work up/M.D. It is important to speak to your doctor about the possible causes of her chronic cough and infection. Your doctor may order an imaging test, CF sweat test and immune work up and will consider ciliary disorders. If the cough is associated with sputum, then cultures may be ordered to detect persistent viruses and bacterial infections, for example. It is best to avoid smoke, to keep her well hydrated. Read more...
Chronic bronchitis. Reactive airway. Asthma- needs to be managed under the care of your pediatrician, pediatric allergist or pediatric pulmonologist. A family doctor if specialists are not available. Yes, it is dangerous if not treated. It is reversible and easily treated with inhaled/ oral steroids and bronchodilators. Maintenance and compliance are key to successful treatment. Go to er if having acute attack now. Read more...