What are the chances of sudden tinnitus in one ear being "acoustic neuroma"?

Not likely. Acoustic neuroma is a very slow-growing tumor. Not likely at your age. Are you suffering from intermittent vertigo? Having any hearing loss? Exposure to loud noises? Taken any medications (High dose aspirin can cause tinnitus. Tinnitus is also a rare side effect of hydrocodone/tylenol)? Tinnitus is common, and difficult to treat. If no improvement in a month or two, see an ENT specialist.

Related Questions

Is an acoustic neuroma always the cause of high frequency hearing loss in one ear only with tinnitus, in 19yr old?

Acoustic neuroma. Usually is result of multiple ear infections as a child but you should see an ENT as soon as possible. Read more...
No. high frequency hearing loss may be secondary to noise, inefection, or inherited. Hearing loss in one ear should be evaluated by an ENT doctor to determine cause. Read more...

I have unilateral tinnitus. If l also hear slightly less well with that same ear, is acoustic neuroma still unlikely?

Rare. A good work up for tinnitus with unilateral hearing loss would include a test to r/o an acoustic neuroma (mri). It is doubtful, but the MRI would check for irregularities including ruling out an acoustic neuroma. Best wishes. Read more...
Acoustic Neuroma. An acoustic neuroma is a slow-growing tumor of the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The symptoms vary based on the size of the tumor. Common symptoms include: abnormal feeling of movement (vertigo), hearing loss in the affected ear, ringing (tinnitus) in the affected ear, dizziness, headache, numbness in the face or one ear, pain in the face or one ear, and weakness of the face. Read more...
Possible. Need MRI for unilateral tinnitus and hearing loss. Chance that this represents acoustic neuroma is statistically small, but MRI should be done to rule out serious cause of the hearing loss and tinnitus. Read more...

Episodes of vertigo, tinnitus, fullness in ear. OAE showed left ear damage. Now having ABR test. What can ABR determine aside from acoustic neuroma?

This test. measures the "connection" between the outside (cochlear) hearing organ and the brain itself! It is used for a number of hearing/balance issues besides acoustic neuroma. You should discuss this question with the Health Care Professional who ordered the test....(good advice for ALL MEDICAL TESTING!) Hope this helps! Dr Z. Read more...

Acoustic neuroma ear hypercausis, what to do?

Depends. surgery or radiotherapy may help. Would see a neurosurgeon and a radiation oncologist. Tumor size is an important factor. Read more...

What kinds of things cause unilateral tinnitus (had this for years) and asymmetrical hearing loss? Causes other than acoustic neuroma?

Tinnitus and hearing. Hearing loss usually is associated with tinnitus. The loss can come from damage to the auditory nerve, or the hearing portion of the inner ear (both, which also as a vestibular component). There can be vascular damage, infection or hereditary causes. Sometimes trauma, or exposure to loud noises unilaterally can cause this. Read more...
Hearing loss. Genetics, infection, acoustic trauma, idiopathic. Acoustic neuroma is fairly uncommon though needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Read more...

Minor hearing loss, occasional dizziness and constant tinnitus. But I'm only 21. I'm having an mri. Is an acoustic neuroma possible at my age?

Rare. Your doctor is doing the right thing by getting the mri. "sounds" like you've already had a hearing test, which is really necessary too. You are very young to have this, unless you have neurofibromatosis- which you would likely know if you did. I've never seen it in someone as young as you. Read more...
Neuroma. Yes. But they are quite uncommon, occurring between 1 and 3 people per 100, 000 in the general population. Also less likely if the hearing loss and tinnitus are in both ears. Read more...