How can I handle my pelvic floor disease (PFD) and interstitial cystitis (IC)?

Be wary. ? Re: how handle pelvic floor & Interstitial Cystitis, IC, disorders. Etiology of IC is speculative, unknown, absent pathological confirmation & simply label for a unique set of symptoms. I posit that in many cases of IC there is associated sacroiliac joint hypermobility, which can be diagnosed via criteria reported in the Occupational Disability Guides, the ODG. See an Osteopath for an opinion. .

Related Questions

When my hubby ejucalates inside me his semen stings. I do have interstitial cystitis, pelvic floor dysfunction. I'm thinking I have vulvodynia. Why?

Pelvic Girdle Pain. 40's female with pelvic pain at intercourse likely has referred pain from sacroiliac joints strained by leveraging forces from femur shifted forcefully into abduction ; external rotation. A spooning posture is preferred to missionary position during sexual activity. Ic concurrently raises concern for joint hypermobility syndrome (jhs), which is an associated marker. Read more...

Is pelvic floor rehabilitation therapy effective for interstitial cystitis (aka: painful bladder syndrome)?

For symptoms yes. But it probably doesn't actually treat the condition ie heal the bladder wall. Painful bladder syndrome includes manythings that aren't ic such as pelvic floor dysfunction that will respond well to rehab. Read more...
YES. Many cases of ic or pbs are really problems of pelvic muscle and nerve dysfunction and not a bladder disease. Pelvic floor pt can be incredibly helpful. Read more...

Pelvic pain and back pain. Doctors say no source and diagnosed interstitial cystitis. Is this correct?

Pelvic and back pain. This is difficult to say without knowing what tests were performed. A full pelvic, abdominal and lumbar spine examination along with pelvic ultrasound and urinalysis should be performed. Also knowing when , in what circumstances and timeof month this occurs would help. Your age and menstrual status would help differenciate possible cause. Read more...
Possibly. Interstitial cystitis pain is usually pelvic and often at its peak when your bladder is full and somewhat relieved by urinating. Usually associated with frequent urination and urinating at night. Symptoms are increased with caffeine or acid urine producing beverages such as oj or foods such as tomato sauce or paste. Can be lessened with a bland diet. Check out the interstitial cystitis website. Read more...
Trigger points!! This is a new look at an old idea. Janet g. Travell, md a pain pioneer concluded that chronic tissue pain was caused by numerous trigger points in muscle fibers causing the muscles to contract compressing nerves, vessels and alter the flow of lymphatics. The pyramidalis and pelvic floor muscles are the cause. So this is a mechanical cause and requires a manual treatment. Acupuncture! see files. Read more...

Help! Dx'd w/ interstitial cystitis as child (pelvic pain w/ full bladder, glomerulations present w/ distention).Dsmo helped! New md doubts ic. Did no tests & is clueless.?

2nd opinion. There are a variety of treatments for interstitial cystitis including medications and dietary changes. If you are not satisfied with the diagnosis of this physician then consider getting a second opinion. Emiron is a highly effective medication. Lidocaine bladder irrigation and interstim could also be considered. Read more...

Can oxybutinin be used to treat non bacterial prostatitis/interstitial cystitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome?

Short no. It is not useful as symptom complex is much different then that for which oxybutinin is used for. You need evaluation and then specific rx. Read more...
Yes. Oxybutynin is an antimuscarinic and primarily used for the symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence. Though most commonly used as part of the treatment of overactive bladder and neurogenic bladder-related detrusor instability it can be used for any condition or symptom complex with bothersome bladder-related urinary urgency and frequency. It treats the symptom, not the disease. Read more...