Related Questions

Is pulmonary embolism an obstruction in the main artery to the lung?

Any artery. A pulmonary embolism (pe) is a clot in any of the arteries in the lungs. If the clot is large, it will lodge in one of the larger arteries, and can be fatal. If the clot is smaller, it will travel into the lung until the vessel is small enough to trap it, and may not even cause much in the way of symptoms. Any pe is serious, and the source of the clot needs to be found to prevent recurrences. Read more...
No. A clot travelling through the pulmonary artery may lodge anywhere between the pulmonary artery and its distal branches depending on size of the clot, size of the vessel and friability of the clot. A large clot may lodge in the "main" pulmonary artery and produce sudden death, or it may breakup on its journey and produce a shower of multiple small clots in more distal vessels with minimal symptoms. Read more...
Pulmonary embolism. Is a clot/thrombus with the main pulmonary artery on one of its branches. Read more...
Yes. Pulmonary embolism is an obstruction, usually caused by a blood clot, in the arteries that go from the right side of the heart to the lungs. Does not have to be in the main artery necessarily. Read more...

Any ideas why heart failures come from pulmonary embolism in the right upper lobe of the lung in arteriosclerosis?

Several ways. The pe can cause low oxygen including what goes to the heart. It can put strain on the heart, dilate the right side, cause hormones to be released cause tachycardia and due to that chf, arrhythmia and failure of the heart to push blood if big enough. It can then cause paradoxical pressures in the ventricles collapsing the left ventricle due to right pressure. Read more...

Is non specific t wave abnormality a sign of pulmonary embolism diagnosed chest infection never had abnormal ECG before this?

NSTW changes. Hi, I don't think it is, the ECG changes in Pulm Embolism are the sign of right heart strains and show itself in the right leads like v1-v4 and inferior leads II, III and aVF, and I don't see why a 24 yo otherwise healthy man should have PE if no risk factor presents. Read more...
Not a problem. Nonspecific T wave changes are common and often seen in normal people. They are not a sign of pulmonary embolism or anything else. Many normal people have nonspecific changes in their ECG from time to time. Often they come and go. None of this is abnormal. Read more...
Non-specific.. ... means exactly that, non-specific. The ECG is just one part of a clinical evaluation, and must be interpreted in the context of what is happening with the patient. Just the one piece of information is not diagnostic of anything, but is part of the evaluation that includes the patient's story, the physical exam, and clinical impression. Please follow up with your doctor to get answers. Read more...