I have dry gangrene on my both palms and both feet soles what medicine I should take?

See a doctor. True gangrene is a result of a serious bacterial infection. What is the reason for both palms and soles to be affected? You need to be evaluated by a physician.
See a doctor. Gangrene is a serious issue; you should never be self-treating or diagnosing gangrene. In order to preserve as much function as possible, see a doctor to verify the diagnosis.

Related Questions

Is it possible to treat dry gangrene without surgery of foot to kidney patient?

Depends. Depends on the level of gangrene. If it is the toes, they will fall off by themselves and there is not need of any surgical intervention. If it is the foot then you may need some sort of surgical intervention. Vascular continents is important as well. Read more...
Yes. If no infection just leave it alone. If infection seed you will need surgery. Read more...
Maybe. Can wait for the line of dead tissue to define itself, and at that point may be able to remove tissue. However, must watch for infection, make sure the pain is controlled, and determine why there is dry gangrene so the underlying pathology can be addressed. Read more...
Gangrene. It depends on where the gangrene is located. In the digits the gangrene will demarcate where the tissue death\ has occured and the to will fall off by itself. It must be monitored for infection. In other areas there may well be a need for surgical intervention - but first studies need to be done to determine where proper perfusion is . Good luck. Read more...
Possibly. But probably not. You need vascular studies to see where the blockage of blood flow is, and take it from there. One must be vigilant for ascending infections when gangrene is present. Read more...

I developed severe dry gangrene on right foot after trauma, 4 toes already amputated, but it is spreading very slow. How long can I delay amputation?

If there is no . Infection you can delay in definately as the gangrenous tissue will auto amputate, however, I would make sure I am evaluated by a vascular doctor. Read more...

I have lots of dry gangrene on right foot, lost 4 toes, but it doesn't go past the mid-foot. Why would they amputate to knee? Why not just that part?

Circulation. Normally if there is a problem with blood supply to the affected part, amputation to the point of adequate circulation is necessary. You need to insist on an explanation from your treating physicians before consenting. Read more...

Mom (diabetic)has dry gangrene on toe. Angioplasty failed, doctors say vascular surgery imposible (foot veins too small), how can we restore bloodflow?

Maybe not. Typically, diabetic vascular disease involves the microscopic blood vessels of the foot, so even in the event more blood flow gets to the foot, it can't get through the obstructed outflow that occurs in these tiny blood vessels. This is one reason why bypass won't work in some diabetics. Smoking cessation is also very important, as is tight control of blood sugar. Hope this helps! Read more...
You don't. Gangrene is dead tissue. If there is gangrene of the toe, that part of the toe is gone. If there is poor blood flow to the leg, there are techniques to improve flow, starting proximally and going toward the foot. These may or may not work, but they are designed to limit the level of an amputation. Read more...
Unreconstructible. This situation is what vascular surgeons call unreconstructible: the small arteries in the calf and foot are too small or obstructed to allow a bypass and conventional angioplasty may not work. Sometimes there is no way to restore blood flow but some surgeons and angiologists have had success at opening up these small vessels with angioplasty. Get another opinion from another expert. Read more...