24 doctors weighed in:

Cure of sleep apnea?

24 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Internal Medicine - Geriatrics
15 doctors agree

In brief: No cure

There is high failure rate of surgical procedures for sleep apnea.
Best treatment is the CPAP mask adjusted to the right pressure. There are some that automatically adjust themselves for the best pressure. Need to get the most comfortable mask & less noisy machine .Complications of surgery include airway obstruction, bleeding, hematoma, infection, pain, death, dysphagia, velopharyngeal etc...

In brief: No cure

There is high failure rate of surgical procedures for sleep apnea.
Best treatment is the CPAP mask adjusted to the right pressure. There are some that automatically adjust themselves for the best pressure. Need to get the most comfortable mask & less noisy machine .Complications of surgery include airway obstruction, bleeding, hematoma, infection, pain, death, dysphagia, velopharyngeal etc...
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
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1 comment
Dr. James Donley
There is no cure for sleep apnea, only management of the problem. Traditional treatment has been the CPAP or some variation of it. Oral appliances to reposition the tongue and lower jaw to open the airway have been available over 25 years. In February 2006, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine said that for mild to moderate sleep apnea or those with severe sleep apnea who can't or won't use a CPAP, an oral appliance can be the treatment of choice. Surgery is a poor third choice as it is often not successful.
Dr. Jason Hall
Surgery - Plastics
6 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

It depends on the cause (i'm assuming its osa), and the sites of obstruction of your airway.
There are a number of surgical options, including palatal reductions (uppp), tonsillectomy, and nasal surgery. Surgery to move both upper and lower jaw bones forward is the closest thing to a surgical cure available, but only in the right patients. See a specialist in your area for more info.

In brief: Depends

It depends on the cause (i'm assuming its osa), and the sites of obstruction of your airway.
There are a number of surgical options, including palatal reductions (uppp), tonsillectomy, and nasal surgery. Surgery to move both upper and lower jaw bones forward is the closest thing to a surgical cure available, but only in the right patients. See a specialist in your area for more info.
Dr. Jason Hall
Dr. Jason Hall
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1 comment
Dr. Gary Lederman
Ask a sleep trained dentist about a MAD device that can improve obstructive sleep,apnea.
2 doctors agree

In brief: No real cure

The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.

In brief: No real cure

The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea.
But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway.
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
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Dr. Danny Proffitt
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Probably not

Probably no cure but sure can try! weight loss is essential.
After that, treatment as advised by a sleep specialist, c-pap and all. One may need a uppp procedure that may "cure" the sleep apnea. Usually a controlled condition. Hold out out hope but don't hold your breath!

In brief: Probably not

Probably no cure but sure can try! weight loss is essential.
After that, treatment as advised by a sleep specialist, c-pap and all. One may need a uppp procedure that may "cure" the sleep apnea. Usually a controlled condition. Hold out out hope but don't hold your breath!
Dr. Danny Proffitt
Dr. Danny Proffitt
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Dr. Majid Jamali
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Sleep apnea

There has been many controversies regarding this subject over the years.
Tracheotomy is the ultimate solution. However, since this procedure is aggressive and leaves a poor scar, it has remained the last resort. Sleep study is a must to see how severe the signs are. Weight loss, cutting down on alcohol is next. Nares, septum, uvula, tongue, mandible position has to be checked.

In brief: Sleep apnea

There has been many controversies regarding this subject over the years.
Tracheotomy is the ultimate solution. However, since this procedure is aggressive and leaves a poor scar, it has remained the last resort. Sleep study is a must to see how severe the signs are. Weight loss, cutting down on alcohol is next. Nares, septum, uvula, tongue, mandible position has to be checked.
Dr. Majid Jamali
Dr. Majid Jamali
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Dr. Masoud Sadighpour
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Report of cure

There are report of 90% of cure rate for "bimaxillary advancement osteotomy" from stanford, ca sleep clinics.
It is a surgery that might be the second or third stage of different surgeries. If you are 20 year old having severe sleep apnea i might consider this approach. If on the other hand you are 60 y/o, i will stay with CPAP which is the safest treatment of sleep apnea.

In brief: Report of cure

There are report of 90% of cure rate for "bimaxillary advancement osteotomy" from stanford, ca sleep clinics.
It is a surgery that might be the second or third stage of different surgeries. If you are 20 year old having severe sleep apnea i might consider this approach. If on the other hand you are 60 y/o, i will stay with CPAP which is the safest treatment of sleep apnea.
Dr. Masoud Sadighpour
Dr. Masoud Sadighpour
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Dr. Daniel Sampson
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Technically no

We manage sleep apnea, not necessarily cure it.
Treatment options include cpap, oral appliances, weight loss or surgical procedures. Typically, newly diagnosed patients are started out on cpap. Surgery can have a high success rate in the right patient population.

In brief: Technically no

We manage sleep apnea, not necessarily cure it.
Treatment options include cpap, oral appliances, weight loss or surgical procedures. Typically, newly diagnosed patients are started out on cpap. Surgery can have a high success rate in the right patient population.
Dr. Daniel Sampson
Dr. Daniel Sampson
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Dr. Louis Gallia
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial

In brief: Management

Management with treatment.
Weight loss, CPAP, oral appliances, occasionally surgery.

In brief: Management

Management with treatment.
Weight loss, CPAP, oral appliances, occasionally surgery.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Dr. Louis Gallia
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Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine

In brief: R/O OSA

OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.

In brief: R/O OSA

OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.
Dr. John Feola
Dr. John Feola
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