5 doctors weighed in:

What can cause a fluid filled flexor tendon and what are some treatments? Recovery times?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Surgery - Hand Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Tendon fluid

Typically doesn't to accumulate in the acgtural tendon but in the tendon sheath or covering that hold the tendon in place.
Still we often say " your tendon is swollen" when we mean the tissues around it. Common terms like tendinitis, or tenosynovitis are also intermingled . Rx for swollen tendons is ice, NSAIDs, splinting, therapy, cortisone injections and surgery . Recovery TIME = long answer

In brief: Tendon fluid

Typically doesn't to accumulate in the acgtural tendon but in the tendon sheath or covering that hold the tendon in place.
Still we often say " your tendon is swollen" when we mean the tissues around it. Common terms like tendinitis, or tenosynovitis are also intermingled . Rx for swollen tendons is ice, NSAIDs, splinting, therapy, cortisone injections and surgery . Recovery TIME = long answer
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Thank
Dr. David Bozak
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Tendinitis

How do you know the tendon is "fluid filled"? A tendinitis can have some swelling around the tendon that can be seen on ultrasound or mri.
If there is a tear in the tendon this can happen too. Treatment would be nsaids and physical therapy first, followed possibly by a cortisone injection. If there is a tear it may need surgical repair.

In brief: Tendinitis

How do you know the tendon is "fluid filled"? A tendinitis can have some swelling around the tendon that can be seen on ultrasound or mri.
If there is a tear in the tendon this can happen too. Treatment would be nsaids and physical therapy first, followed possibly by a cortisone injection. If there is a tear it may need surgical repair.
Dr. David Bozak
Dr. David Bozak
Thank
Dr. Edward Hellman
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: Varies

Most commonly either inflammation or infectious (less common).
Don’t hesitate to see a hand specialist to discuss treatment options.

In brief: Varies

Most commonly either inflammation or infectious (less common).
Don’t hesitate to see a hand specialist to discuss treatment options.
Dr. Edward Hellman
Dr. Edward Hellman
Thank
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