26 doctors weighed in:
My child had a cold 2 weeks ago with a low fever and today I think she is getting one again is it possible she culd be getting the same thing again?
26 doctors weighed in

Dr. Cindy Juster
Pediatrics
21 doctors agree
In brief: Probably a new virus
There are so many viruses - and so many strains of each virus - that it's likely she caught a new one.
Depending on her age and whether she's in daycare, she could have up to dozens of colds a year; sometimes one doesn't completely clear before the next starts!

In brief: Probably a new virus
There are so many viruses - and so many strains of each virus - that it's likely she caught a new one.
Depending on her age and whether she's in daycare, she could have up to dozens of colds a year; sometimes one doesn't completely clear before the next starts!
Dr. Cindy Juster
Dr. Cindy Juster
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2 comments
Dr. Richard Auerbach
If there is no significant resolution over the 2 week period, s/he may be developing a sinus or ear infection. Most typical colds last 1-2 weeks. If s/he is school-age, it may seem as if they have a drippy nose all winter.
Dr. Sahba Ferdowsi
I recommend taking her to her pediatrician if her symptoms don't improve. Wishing you and your little one the best.
Dr. Kelly Kane
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree
In brief: A cold again
Cold weather is a vulnerable time for little ones, especially those in day care.
Chances are this is something new to her. There will likely be more of the same as this winter passes. We do build immunity against the common cold, but there are many varieties, there's always something going around. I would watch carefully for prolonged fever, shortness of breath, poor eating or worsening.

In brief: A cold again
Cold weather is a vulnerable time for little ones, especially those in day care.
Chances are this is something new to her. There will likely be more of the same as this winter passes. We do build immunity against the common cold, but there are many varieties, there's always something going around. I would watch carefully for prolonged fever, shortness of breath, poor eating or worsening.
Dr. Kelly Kane
Dr. Kelly Kane
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Dr. James Volk
Pediatrics
In brief: No
Antibodies specific to viral and bacterial infections develop within 7-10 days of onset of respiratory infections.
Once antibodies are present the symptoms will decrease unless another infection develops. Bacterial infections frequently occur after viral infections and viral infections also promote other viral infections due to destruction of the protective barriers of skin and lining of the nose.

In brief: No
Antibodies specific to viral and bacterial infections develop within 7-10 days of onset of respiratory infections.
Once antibodies are present the symptoms will decrease unless another infection develops. Bacterial infections frequently occur after viral infections and viral infections also promote other viral infections due to destruction of the protective barriers of skin and lining of the nose.
Dr. James Volk
Dr. James Volk
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Dr. Cindy Juster
Board Certified, Pediatrics
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