11 doctors weighed in:

My son has severe asthma. He's taking 2x seretide 6x atrovent (ipratropium) 6xs albuterol 1x singular with all this, he still gets breathless. Could he need oxygen?

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Rosenthal
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
5 doctors agree

In brief: Asthma and Oxygen

Not likely. He should see a qualified allergist/immunologist who can help treat your son.
Oxygen does not have a role in the treatment of asthma chronically, only during an acute episode requiring hospitalization. Most asthmatics who get "breathless" are not getting the right set of medicines, are not inhaling them properly, or have an additional/other diagnosis. Seeing a specialist will help.

In brief: Asthma and Oxygen

Not likely. He should see a qualified allergist/immunologist who can help treat your son.
Oxygen does not have a role in the treatment of asthma chronically, only during an acute episode requiring hospitalization. Most asthmatics who get "breathless" are not getting the right set of medicines, are not inhaling them properly, or have an additional/other diagnosis. Seeing a specialist will help.
Dr. David Rosenthal
Dr. David Rosenthal
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Dr. Steven Machtinger
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
2 doctors agree

In brief: He might at times

Your son is taking seretide (=advair) 2x/day, singuilair, salbutamol(=albuterol) 2x/day & atrovent (ipratropium) 6x/day.
That's a lot of medication. His reliance on reliever medications (salbutamol & atrovent (ipratropium)) several times a day means asthma in not well-controlled. In the U.S. If your son were >12 years of age he would be a candidate for xolair therapy. For asthma oxygen therapy is used only in emergencies.

In brief: He might at times

Your son is taking seretide (=advair) 2x/day, singuilair, salbutamol(=albuterol) 2x/day & atrovent (ipratropium) 6x/day.
That's a lot of medication. His reliance on reliever medications (salbutamol & atrovent (ipratropium)) several times a day means asthma in not well-controlled. In the U.S. If your son were >12 years of age he would be a candidate for xolair therapy. For asthma oxygen therapy is used only in emergencies.
Dr. Steven Machtinger
Dr. Steven Machtinger
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Re evaluation needed

Your child is on many medications, some of which are rescue meds and some are maintenance medications.
Sounds like he/she needs an evaluation by a pediatrician, allergist or pulmonologist, who is comfortable managing moderate persistent to severe asthmatics and can teach you how to use a home asthma action plan based on peak flow readings that you do 2 times a day at home to determine which meds.

In brief: Re evaluation needed

Your child is on many medications, some of which are rescue meds and some are maintenance medications.
Sounds like he/she needs an evaluation by a pediatrician, allergist or pulmonologist, who is comfortable managing moderate persistent to severe asthmatics and can teach you how to use a home asthma action plan based on peak flow readings that you do 2 times a day at home to determine which meds.
Dr. Tammi Schlichtemeier
Dr. Tammi Schlichtemeier
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Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
Pediatrics - Pulmonology

In brief: Other thoughts

I would suggest reviewing contributing factors, such as triggers of the asthma attacks, smoke exposure, reflux and using a HEPA filter unit at home.
A virtual appt is available online: healthtap.com/DosanjhMD Code: NCYHPZ

In brief: Other thoughts

I would suggest reviewing contributing factors, such as triggers of the asthma attacks, smoke exposure, reflux and using a HEPA filter unit at home.
A virtual appt is available online: healthtap.com/DosanjhMD Code: NCYHPZ
Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
Dr. Amrita Dosanjh
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Dr. Jack Mutnick
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology

In brief: Breathing Problems

Your son obviously has breathing problems but your medication description is very confusing.
He obviously needs to be seen by an asthma or pulmonary specialist. But the first thing is to make sure you are using the medications currently prescribed for you correctly. Many patients are confused by which med to use when. See your primary doctor or call them immediately if u r unsure of his meds.

In brief: Breathing Problems

Your son obviously has breathing problems but your medication description is very confusing.
He obviously needs to be seen by an asthma or pulmonary specialist. But the first thing is to make sure you are using the medications currently prescribed for you correctly. Many patients are confused by which med to use when. See your primary doctor or call them immediately if u r unsure of his meds.
Dr. Jack Mutnick
Dr. Jack Mutnick
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