Can I walk with a cam walker after hammer toe surgery and pins in my toes to straighten them?

Yes. A surgical shoe is usually enough, however, a rigid walking boot such as a cam walker will work as well. Consult with your surgeon as to what he or she would think would be best for you.
Yes you can walk. Yes you can walk in a cam walker after hammer toe surgery. The benefit is that is allows you to walk without disturbing the pins or correction. The cam walker is made with a rocker bottom sole to allow the foot to be controlled in during the gait cycle. I would recommend using crutches for the first couple of days to allow you to get used to walking in the boot .
Yes. You can. If only hammer toe surgery was performed then a surgical shoe is often sufficient and much lighter than a cam walker boot. However, your surgeon should decide what is best for you.
Yes. A cam walker, or cast boot, will help immobilize the foot and decrease the pressure on the toes to flex. Pins that are straight are much easier to remove! follow all post op instructions for best results. Dr l.
Yes. You should be able to walk with a cam boot. However some boots have a scooped area at the toe and that can be a problem. Some of the "bunion boots" have a flatter footplate that may work better.
Cam walker. Usually , yes. It will depend on your surgeon's preferences as well as how compliant you are. The goal of the cam walker is to remove motion and allow the surgical site to heal .
Ask your surgeon. You should ask your surgeon but usually this is acceptable.

Related Questions

3 weeks ago foot broken per er. Got a cam walker but not ready to walk. Can I use my crutches? Foot is hurting since husband tried to move big toe.

Use the crutch. You can use the crutch and avoid put weight on it and need to follow up with orthopedic. If symptom worse you need to see your orthopedic sooner. Read more...
C an ortho. The rx depends what bone, how bad. Use ur crutches, no weight until u c an orthopedic surgeon. Read more...
Broken foot. You need to follow up with a doc asap. Waiting 3 weeks after visiting the er is unacceptable. Read more...
. If still hurting you may need more physiotherapy. Check with your physiotherapist or orthopedics before weight bearing. From profile i see you are 59 years old and a female so it may take you longer to heal. Read more...

What alternative surgeries exist for non diabetic ulcer on sole of the foot vs skin graft. I'm offloading in cam Walker daily for 5 years. Need help?

Foot Ulcers. There are only a few factors that cause ulcers not to heal-5 years is FAR too long to have a non healing ulcer. Conditions that cause ulcers not to heal include infection and/or underlying bone infection, Poor vascularity, Pressure on the wound (A CAM walker alone may not be enough to off-load the area) and nutritional deficiency. A graft will not work if any of these are present. Read more...
Depend. it is really depend on the size of the ulcer, and the depth and the staging of the ulcer, and last if the ulcer is necrotic,or infected. Debridment of the necrotic and infected tissues is essential for the ulcer to heal. Skin coverage could varies to many options including skin graft. You can discuss the different options with your surgeon,general,vascular,foot,or orthopedist. Read more...
What in the world. There are many ways to close non-diabetic wounds on the foot. For yours to go on for 5 years means that you need to find a new doctor, unless you are being non-compliant with his recommendations. A great wound care clinic that offers Infectious disease specialists, orthopedic surgeons, podiatrists and wound care specialists may be the best option at this time. Experience is everything. Read more...

Navicular sfx 6 weeks nwb CAM walker, graduated to walking, now part time in shoes. Pins and needles in ball of foot and toes. Normal? Do I need PT?

Focal neuropathy. Sometimes a foot injury can involve an adjacent nerve. In the foot, the medial and lateral plantar nerves serve sensation to the sole and ball of the foot. They can be injured directly from the injury, or from compression at the tarsal tunnel, sometimes seen when you begin activity that you had not done as much of. An EMG from a skilled neurophysiologist might localize the problem. Read more...
Sounds like nerve... Involvement somewhere. Physical therapy may be very helpful. There may just be some residual swelling compressing a nerve traveling through the same area. Prescription anti-inflammatory medicines (or otc aleve) may be very helpful as well. Ask your doctor. Read more...