What exercises help or hinder a torn meniscus?

Be Mindful. Depends on your age, degree of symptoms or pain, and degree of arthritis. Many meniscus tears may be minimal in terms of pain, and so a quadriceps and hamstring strengthening program which avoids impact may be beneficial. However, if the tear is associated with significant pain, swelling or instability, arthroscopic meniscectomy should be considered, especially in the absence of arthritic change.
Exercise little help. A torn meniscus of the knee causes irritation inside the joint which gives us pain and swelling. Unfortunately, torn menisci typically do not heal since torn cartilage does not heal back together. Most people have arthroscopic surgery to have the torn section trimmed out. Exercise within the pain free range is ok to maintain strength but will not help it to heal.
None specifically. Although appropriate exercises directed by your physician are important as part of the rehabilitative process, there are no known exercises which have been shown to improve healing of a meniscus tear. Deep squats can place extra stress on the meniscus and could impede healing. Unfortunately vary few meniscal tears are likely to heal without treatment (usually surgery).
None. There is no exercise that helps a meniscus tear. Cutting activities or deep squats would make a meniscus tear more painful.

Related Questions

Okay to exercise on elliptical with torn meniscus?

No twist. Best to get it fixed. However, in the mean time, avoid twisting and pivoting activities as well as high impact. Stationary biking and elliptical would be best. Read more...

Had surgery for a torn meniscus - what post-op exercises should I do?

Quad exercises. Any trauma to the knee (including surgery or arthroscopy) can cause quad inhibition, where the quad muscles stop functioning normally. It is most important to retrain them to work properly. Walking without a limp, exercise bicycle, stairclimbing, lunges, and squats are all excellent ways. Isometrics (holding the knee straight for long periods) is another excellent exercise. Read more...

I'm getting an arthroscopy to repair possible torn meniscus, how long will I need to wait until I can exercise?

It depends. After meniscal repair, you need to be nonweight bearing for 6 weeks, then gradually increase weight bearing as tolerated. You'll particfipate in a supervised rehab program for the first 3 months after surgery. After 12 weeks you can do low impact exercises. If you just have a simple partial meniscectomy (debridement), you should be able to return to activities in 10 to 14 days. Read more...
Depends. If your meniscus is amenable to repair, you will usually be non-weight bearing for 4-6 wks. Early therapy will focus on range of motion. Follow your surgeon's instructions. Read more...

What are some physical therapy exercises for a torn meniscus?

Repair. Torn meniscus cartilages should be saved if at all possible. While exercising with a bike and a pool are usually safe, repair is preferred. Read more...
Meniscal tear . Straight leg lifts ( with or without ankle weights) performed on your backs and sides combined with rest may help reduce your symptoms. Unfortunately most meniscal tears at your age will not heal and will remain symptomatic without surgery. Read more...

What are good physical therapy exercises for a torn meniscus?

After we care of . Torn portion, then we exercise, physical therapy after a meniscal tear focuses on strengthening the muscles of your upper leg, calf and hip, which all work to support the knee. See the picture please. Read more...

What are some good physical therapy exercises to do for a torn meniscus?

Many. Physical therapy and rehab exercises for tears of the meniscus will vary based on the severity of the injury, so check with your physical therapist or doctor for specifics. In general, any exercise that strengthens the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and hips will be beneficial, as will ones that improve balance (proprioceptive exercises), flexibility, and range of motion. Read more...
None. While you can do exercises to strengthen the muscles that support and surround your knee, these will not lead to healing of torn cartilage/meniscus. Avoid high impact and twisting/pivoting activities. Best option is to fix the torn meniscus surgically. Read more...