What does coronary atherosclerosis native mean?

Arterial narrowing. Plaque build up within the blood vessel supplying blood flow to the heart.
One's own. Native coronary means the arteries of that person. There are generally three major vessels. Atherosclerosis is the term for plaque buildup and obstruction of the blood vessel. This is the process which leads to heart attacks.

Related Questions

My husband is been diagnose with coronary atherosclerosis of native coronary artery. I would like to know more about this and how I can help him?

Read. The book by dr caldwell esselstyn. "preventing and reversing cardiovascular disease with a plant based diet" a twenty year study he carried out at the cleveland clinic foundation. It is slow, but it works.
Atherosclerosis. Should be on low fat diet, exercise, not smoke and keep diabetics and hypertension under control.
CAD. Coronary artery disease is the accumulation of cholesterol plaques in the lining of the blood vessels that go to the heart. It is caused by inflammation and has a dietary component too. Talk to a cardiologist and a heart surgeon. It is important to know how he was diagnosed and family history is critical. Learn the sigs and symptoms of a heart attack for him and you.

What is coronary atherosclerosis?

Plaque buildup. Little spots along the coronary arteries (they "crown" the heart) develop patches of macrophages that become loaded with cholesterol, and eventually scarring narrows the artery; the spot may burst or a bleed into the spot, either causing sudden death. There are many fewer deaths from coronary atherosclerosis today than in the past, mostly due to healthier lifestyles.
Artery disease+Clots. Artery disease, aka atherosclerosis, is an accumulation of white blood cells, mostly macrophages which have invaded into the walls of arteries to remove low density lipoprotein (fat carrying protein) particles. The macrophages may die if overwhelmed with fat molecules & cannot export the ingested fat into high density lipoprotein particles. Ruptures of plaque induces clots which narrow the artery.

Is there many vegans that get coronary atherosclerosis?

There can be. There are multiple risk factors for atherosclerosis: hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, family history of heart disease or stroke, getting older, being a man. Being a vegan may help with dietary concerns that influence cholesterol levels, but it does not negate heriditary risk.
Yes, many... Atherosclerosis is an accumulation of white blood cells in artery walls, there to remove low density lipoprotein (fat carrying protein) particles. Cholesterol, about 30% of the fat molecules in all animal cell membranes, are manufactured by every animal cell, a cellular survival issue. Plants do not make cholesterol. Cholesterol is promoted as a way to estimate lipoproteins; but was never correct.

Is there many cases where kids/teenagers get coronary atherosclerosis?

No. Adolescents/children are more likely to have congenital heart malformations such as a patent foremen ovale (hole between the right and left side of the heart) rather than symptomatic coronary atherosclerosis. However, early athersclerotic changes have been observed in arteries of some children. This is especially true for children at risk with obesity, hypertension, or elevated cholesterol levels.
Rare. There are rare genetic anomalies called progeria (see http://www. Ncbi. Nlm. Nih. Gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0002622/) and werner's syndrome (no relation to me). (see http://ghr. Nlm. Nih. Gov/condition/werner-syndrome) but both of these are very rare. Classic studies in the 50s showed 19 year olds killed in korea had early signs of arteriosclerosis - so we know that the disease begins early in life.
Onset Age 7. Atherosclerosis has been known, for over 7 decades, from autopsy data, to typically begin in later childhood, age 7 y/o typical, earlier with obesity and/or diabetes, yet remains asymptomatic for decades. Arteries enlarge, not shrink. Though ivus commonly detects in teenagers, plaque rupture & clots produce narrowing, typically decades later. Thus symptomatic atherosclerosis in teenagers is rare.

Is there something that starts in teenagers that causes them to later get coronary atherosclerosis?

Yes. The most famous example is from autopsies of us soldiers (ages 18 and above) who died in vietnam. The aortas of many demonstrated fat-laden cells which are the first step toward atherosclerosis. No data, to my knowledge about corresponding lifestyles, but we know many were smokers.
Yes, Many... Atherosclerosis has been known, for over 7 decades, from autopsy data, to typically begin in later childhood, age 7 y/o typical, earlier with obesity and/or diabetes, yet remains asymptomatic for decades. Lipoprotein concentrations are the primary driver. Arteries enlarge, not shrink. Though ivus commonly detects in teenagers, plaque rupture & clots produce narrowing, typically decades later.

Is there any cases where teenagers get coronary atherosclerosis visible on CT scans already?

Kawasaki Disease. This is an inflammation of the arterial wall that happens rarely in young children, sometimes leading to calcification of the arteries later in life. There are also genetic abnormalities both of the arterial wall make-up as well as metabolic problems that lead to early vascular calcification.
Yes, but Unusual. Ivus commonly detects and micro-calcification can be found in early teenager years; atherosclerosis has been known, for over 7 decades, from autopsy data, to typically begin in later childhood. However, the best current ct scanners are typically incapable of detecting calcification within the base of atherosclerotic plaques until most people are early to mid 30s. The e-speed ebt machines work best.

Would you most likely have high blood pressure if you have coronary atherosclerosis?

Depends. While high blood pressure, or hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disese like stroke and heart attacks, many people may develop coronary atherosclerosis (blockages) without necessarily having high blood pressures. Other risk factors; LDL cholesterol, family history, smoking and diabetes, among others, are also important contributors.
Yes. It turns out hypertension (HTN) is considered a "modifiable risk factor" for coronary artery disease (cad)- this means that treating HTN will decrease the risk of cad. About 40%-60% who need a heart bypass have htn. Many consider HTN the greatest risk factor cad. So, yes, you are likely to have HTN if you have CAD but there are always exceptions!
No! Only a Trend. Atherosclerosis is hidden within the walls of arteries. As it progresses, the artery wall thickens & the artery typically enlarges, not narrows, for decades, thus no symptoms. In extremely advanced arterial disease (if without heart damage) the pulse pressure widens because the arteries get stiffer. But transient exercise, emotions, aortic valve leak, avms, etc. Also increase pulse pressure.

I have diabetes and coronary atherosclerosis, I'm almost 55. Why do I constantly feel like I'm sweating profusely, it lasts anywhere from1-5minutes, then it goes away. What causes that?

Symptoms. With your diabetes related symptoms you need a lot of care. 1: You should see a diabetes educator. 2: You need to see a Neurologist 3: You need to see a cardiologist. 4: You need to see your primary doctor. I presume you are seeing all or most of these. If you are not getting the help you need try and find a different physician for the several issues.
Many options. The sweats could be from many causes including perimenopause or cardiac related. If you're not already, you should start a very mild but consistent daily exercise program. Stop if your symptoms get worse, but you may be having the symptoms if you're very out of shape.