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What is the difference between novolin (insulin) n and novolog for a type two diabetic?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Melissa Young
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Onset/duration

Novolin n (a brand of nph) is an intermediate acting insulin.
It starts working after a few hrs, peaks in 6-8 hrs and lasts 12-16 hrs. Novolog is a rapid acting insulin. It starts to work in a few mins, peaks in an hr or two, lasts 4 hrs or so. Novolog is used @meals to prevent post-meal high bs and to "correct" bs. Nph (or better yet a long acting like Lantus (insulin glargine) or levemir) keeps fasting bs lower.

In brief: Onset/duration

Novolin n (a brand of nph) is an intermediate acting insulin.
It starts working after a few hrs, peaks in 6-8 hrs and lasts 12-16 hrs. Novolog is a rapid acting insulin. It starts to work in a few mins, peaks in an hr or two, lasts 4 hrs or so. Novolog is used @meals to prevent post-meal high bs and to "correct" bs. Nph (or better yet a long acting like Lantus (insulin glargine) or levemir) keeps fasting bs lower.
Dr. Melissa Young
Dr. Melissa Young
Thank
Dr. David Sneid
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology

In brief: Big differences

Novolin (insulin) n is human nph, which begins to act in several hours and can last for up to 16 hours.
It is totally unpredictable as to when it acts, for how long, and how potent. Novolog is a rapid-acting Insulin analog, that begins to work in minutes, and is mostly out of your system in several hours. It is given immediately before meals and is very predictable and reproducible.

In brief: Big differences

Novolin (insulin) n is human nph, which begins to act in several hours and can last for up to 16 hours.
It is totally unpredictable as to when it acts, for how long, and how potent. Novolog is a rapid-acting Insulin analog, that begins to work in minutes, and is mostly out of your system in several hours. It is given immediately before meals and is very predictable and reproducible.
Dr. David Sneid
Dr. David Sneid
Thank
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