What is sleep apnea?

Not breathing. Apnea is breath-holding, or not breathing. Some people have periods of time they don't breath while they are asleep. Sometimes it is related to body weight, other times it is neurological. Treatment usually involves weight loss, mouthguards to reposition the mouth, or even cpap. If not treated, this can lead to lung/heart problems, chronic fatigue, weight gain, and high blood pressure.
Choking. There are two types of sleep apnea, both leading to cessation of airflow to the lungs. Central apnea is the less common one and is due to brain controls not sending the signal to breathe. The more common obstructive type is caused by a relaxation of the muscles in the neck to the point of obstruction of airflow. In that situation, there is an effort to breathe, but the windpipe is blocked.
R/O OSA. OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.
Sleep Apnea. If you have symptoms such as insomnia snoring hypersomnia excessive daytime sleepiness obesity asian race cognitive deficits mood disorders htn etc increase the chance of sleep apnea rule out other causes, could be medical, genetic long sleeper etc.

Related Questions

What is sleep apnea?

Stopping breathing. Sleep apnea happens when a person is asleep. Apnea is not breathing (no effort is made to take a breath), or the inabilitiy to breath due to an obstruction (but efforts are made to breathe). Osa is obstructive sleep apnea, which is the common problem heavy snorers have, where the tongue, throat, & neck tissues relax and come together, blocking off air flow and stopping snoring noises momentarily. Read more...
Closed airway. Sleep apnea is the closure of the airway or significant narrowing of the airway during sleep. Risk factors include being male, being overweight, having a large neck, being a snorer and having daytime sleepiness. Sleep apnea increases your risk of stroke, heart attack and high blood pressure. Read more...
Stop breathing. Waking up in the middle of the night gasping for air, snoring, being tired all the time. Read more...
Low blood oxygen . These are typical signs of sleep apnea, a condition which involve periods of ten seconds or more without breathing (apnea) and periods of time with shallow breathing and a significant decrease in blood oxygen levels (hypopnia). This condition can be diagnosed by a sleep specialist with either an overnight at home sleep test or at a sleep clinic utilizing a full psg. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea- a person has pauses in their breathing while sleeping. If left untreated, this can lead to high blood pressure, heart failure, etc. 2 types of sleep apnea-obstructive & central. Obstructive-airways are blocked & lead to pauses. Central-the brain doesn't communicate to your muscles to breathe. More: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea. Read more...

What is sleep apnea like?

Many things. Sleep apnea may be waking up gasping for breath. You are less awake during the day. Driving can be as dangerous as driving drunk. Your attention and concentration is less. It is harder to remember things. You are more irritable and aggressive. It may be harder to keep a job. You will experience more health problems. Treatment can be a breathing machine, surgery, or an oral (dental) appliance. Read more...
Apnea = Suffocation. Like being underwater; unable to breathe. When the co2 in blood gets too high, you blast to surface for a big gasp of air. Osa occurs when airway is blocked during sleep, muscles flaccid/paralyzed. When co2 is too high, brain enters crisis mode, lightens the level of sleep to permit active muscle control and permit a big gasp to replenish o2, then back to deep sleep to do it again. Get osa treated. Read more...
Low blood oxygen . These are typical signs of sleep apnea, a condition which involve periods of ten seconds or more without breathing (apnea) and periods of time with shallow breathing and a significant decrease in blood oxygen levels (hypopnia). This condition can be diagnosed by a sleep specialist with either an overnight at home sleep test or at a sleep clinic utilizing a full psg. Read more...
Tiring. Sleep apnea makes you very tired during the day. You'd nod off while reading or watching television. You may awaken a few times overnight, but the majority of symptoms are actually during the day. Read more...
Hold your breath. Try to exhale then hold your breath for at least ten seconds. Many people have episodes that last more than a minute. Many people with sleep apnea are tired no matter how long they sleep. Imagine being woken up 5 or more times an hour, every hour, for weeks, months, or years. . Read more...
OSA. A disorder in which breathing is frequently interrupted for brief intervals during sleep, Occurs when tissues in the throat collapse and block airflow in and out of the lungs during sleep, resulting in intermittent decreases in blood oxygen levels and transient arousals from sleep, leading to poor sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness. Read more...

What are sleep apnea mouth guards?

MAD. Mandibular advancement devices (mad) - they pull the lower jaw forward to open of the lower airway and pull the tongue forward. They can be very effective - but see a sleep specialist who can fit you for one and monitor success. Read more...
Special appliances. They are special appliances designed to force the lower jaw forward. By doing this the tongue moves forward opening up the back of the throat improving the airway. Read more...
Sleep apnea. These devices are designed to hold the lower jaw forward of the normal bite. This brings the tongue forward which causes an increase in the opening at the back of the throat, allowing more are to pass by. Read more...
Mandible forward. The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea. But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway. Read more...

What is sleep apnea? Can it cause fatigue

Fatigue is common. Sleep apnea is a condition whereby the patient suddenly stops breathing temporarily and then, seconds or up to a minute later the person once again starts breathing. People with sleep apnea often complain of fatigue during the day. Happens often in the presence of parkinson's disease, stroke, ms, and dementia. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is defined as stopping breathing for 10 seconds or more. It can develop for many reasons: allergies, enlarged tonsils and adenoids, deviated septum, being over weight, sleeping on one's back, orthodontic treatment that includes extraction of teeth causes crowding of the arches and tongue, alcohol, medications are just some of the factors that can play a role in developing sleep apnea. Read more...

What besides sleep apnea causes severe sleepiness?

Many things. Often, quality of sleep is an issue as well. It isn't enough to just be in bed for 7-8 hours, the quality is key. Room temperature, light sources, etc are factors. Read more...
Multifactorial. Sleepiness is effected by quality and quantity of sleep. Some things that effect quality are sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, bruxism, lack of rem sleep, circadian rhythm disturbances just to name a few. Narcolepsy can also cause sleep attacks during the day. Other medical conditions such as heart disease, copd, anemia and hypothyroidism can also cause sleepiness. Consult your doctor. Read more...

What causes sleep apnea if one os not overweight and has no history. Tmj, clenching, stiff neck muscles, psychiatric medication?

Sleep disorder. Obstructive sleep apnea is commonly associated with obesity. However, central sleep apnea can be seen in a person with completely normal weight. Most of the times the cause of central sleep apnea is obscured and could not be found. This can be seen in patients using certain pain medications and others suffering from brainstem function problems (ie. Chiari malformation-congenital). Read more...
Several factors. Sleep apnea can happen in people who are not overweight so if you are tired all of the time, have acid reflux, high blood pressure, or diabteic talk to yor doctor about having a sleep study. If you are tired even though you have slept enough time, call your doctor. Read more...
Sleep Apnea. Its the airway structure which is narrow can cause osa without obesity. Read more...
Two kinds . There are two forms of sleep apnea obstructive which is most often caused by obesity or airway abnormalities. And central which is due to your central nervous system disrupting your sleep patterns. Consult a sleep specialist. Read more...
All or none. I have seen many patients for an oral mouthpiece for sleep apnea that are not overweight. A thorough screening and health history with a sleep professional is required to hopefully rule out some of the other causes. Read more...
Many factors. Obstructive vs central sleep apnea. Different disease, different causes. See sleep specialist for sleep studies. Read more...

What exactly is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is stoppage in expiratory breathing. It is usually obstructive in nature and results in increased lung pressures as one breathes out at night. It can also be centrally mediated from the brain center for breathing. Read more...
No breathing. Sleep apnea (sa) is a condition where you stop breathing during sleep for 10 secs or more. Sometimes this is a neurological problem where the signal to breathe is interrupted. Sometimes the signal is fine, but there is blockage by the tongue or tissues of the throat. Either way, it is dangerous and needs to be evaluated by your md and treated appropriately. Call today. Read more...
Apnea = Suffocation. Like being underwater; unable to breathe. When the co2 in blood gets too high, you blast to surface for a big gasp of air. Osa occurs when airway is blocked during sleep, muscles flaccid/paralyzed. When co2 is too high, brain enters crisis mode, lightens the level of sleep to permit active muscle control and permit a big gasp to replenish o2, then back to deep sleep to do it again. Get osa treated. Read more...
Sleep quality issue. In sleep apnea, your airway closes up as you descend into deeper stages of sleep. This causes you to bounce back to a lighter non-restorative stage of sleep where you'll stay for the entire night. Symptoms include snoring, nightmares, daytime somnolence. That's it in a nutshell. Read more...