7 doctors weighed in:
Asthma remedies for home. Singulair (montelukast) makes my heart race and dizzy and just wondering what over-the-counter tea or supplement to take?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Edward Neilsen
Family Medicine
5 doctors agree
In brief: Can be dangerous
Asthma can be a very dangerous illness that can be difficult to treat - often because of side-effects from the medications.
However there are many options with few side-effects, that are used to prevent flare-ups. For example, inhaled steroids (flovent for example) has very few side effects when use appopriately, can can often prevent flare-ups.

In brief: Can be dangerous
Asthma can be a very dangerous illness that can be difficult to treat - often because of side-effects from the medications.
However there are many options with few side-effects, that are used to prevent flare-ups. For example, inhaled steroids (flovent for example) has very few side effects when use appopriately, can can often prevent flare-ups.
Dr. Edward Neilsen
Dr. Edward Neilsen
Thank
1 comment
Dr. William Walsh
Albuterol treats the symptoms of asthma (bronchospasm), but not the underlaying inflammation. If you are using your inhaler more than twice a week that is probably too much, and you should consider an inhaled steroid.
Dr. William Walsh
Addiction Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Black tea
Tea contains theophyline, which is a reasonable third line agent for controlling bronchospasm.
However, if singulair (montelukast) is not working for you, and you are having symptoms more than once a week you would likely benefit from an inhaled corticosteroid. See your asthma specialist (pulmonologist/allergist) and discuss your options.

In brief: Black tea
Tea contains theophyline, which is a reasonable third line agent for controlling bronchospasm.
However, if singulair (montelukast) is not working for you, and you are having symptoms more than once a week you would likely benefit from an inhaled corticosteroid. See your asthma specialist (pulmonologist/allergist) and discuss your options.
Dr. William Walsh
Dr. William Walsh
Thank
1 comment
Dr. James Glauber
Many primary care physicians are quite competent to provide asthma care. I would start with your primary care doctor and perhaps ask whether he/she thinks you may benefit from seeing either an allergist or pulmonologist.
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
48 years in practice
55M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors