After radical prostatectomy followed by radiation therapy in 3 months. Can the cancer come back?

Possibly. The risk of this depends mainly on the pathologic findings (ie, stage and gleason grade) at surgery as well as preoperative psa. There are "nomograms" or calculators of this risk available to estimate such risk. Nomograms.Mskcc.Org/prostate/salvageradiationtherapy.Aspx is one which you might find useful.
Yes. Unfortunately, there is always a chance the cancer come back despite undergoing surgery followed by radiation. Therefore, it is important you are under surveillance by your doctors.

Related Questions

After radical prostatectomy followed by radiation therapy in 3 months. Can the cancer comes back?

Salvage Radiation. Yes, there is a small but definite risk of the cancer coming back after salavage radiation for prostatectomy. Periodic psa surveillance is indicated as adviced by your oncologist. If detected early you may have other treatment alternatives to consider. Read more...
It can. Risk of biological failure, when the psa blood test continues to increase or drops and then increases above what it originally was, is dependent on cells leaking outside of the prostate capsule. This risk is somewhat predictable based on original psa, t stage, and gleason score as well as how much tumor was in the prostate. Xrt after surgery tells me there was concern about leftover cells. Read more...

I am about to have a radical prostatectomy. What is the criteria for follow-up radiation therapy?

Pathology/PSA result. It will depend on what the pathology results show. For example if all the cancer is contained in the gland and margins are negative. Over time the psa needs to be checked and needs to be very low or zero. If it begins to climb upward, depending on the level or how quickly it goes up then radiation may be necessary. Luckily most that have surgery don't need radiation. Read more...
Depends on Pathology. Radiation should be considered after prostatectomy if the cancer has grown through the capsule out of the prostate or into the seminal vesicles or is seen at the edge of the specimen. Other criteria can be close margins, involved lymph nodes, or a persistently elevated psa after surgery. It is always a great idea to meet with a radiation oncologist to review the pathology report after surgery. Read more...
Positive margin, psa. You did not say how old you are, what your gleason score or psa is now, but regardless, you should ask to see a radiotherapy doctor before you undergo surgery. There are many options and many myths. Your best option is to get them ironed out and clarified before doing something you cannot undo. Read more...
Criteria: Soon after surgery, the pathology that may make a radiation oncologist decide to offer radiation include: 1) positive surgical margin 2) extracapsular extension 3) perineural invasion 4) seminal vesicle involvement 4) positive nodes 5)few others your radonc will look at the pathology from surgery as well as your overall condition, etc to make a decision. Read more...
Adjuvant XRT. It depends some on the pathology at the time of the surgery. Were the surgeons able to get out all of the tumor? Did it involve the lymph nodes? Did it involve the seminal vesicles? Most frequently, how does the psa respond to the surgery? Clear margins and an undetectable psa post-opeeratively are usually enough and no further treatment is needed. Read more...
Latest update. There are two very recent clinical studies which showed high risk patients, that is patients with positive margins, seminal vesicles involvement and cancer spreading beyond the capsule, will get benefits from early adjuvant radiation after surgery rather than waiting until psa goes up. They have a better chance of controlling and surviving the prostate cancer if they receive early radiation. Read more...
Follow-up radiation. Radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy are equally effective. If you have decided on surgery, about 10% of the patients need radiation post-op. There are 2 types: adjuvant radiation and salvage radiation. Adjuvant radiation is often recommended if there are positive margins or spread to the seminal vesicles, even if the psa goes to zero. Salvage radiation is indicated if psa is detectable. Read more...
Radiation after surg. There is evidence that it is helpful if the tumor has spread to the seminal vesicles, has positive margins, or if the psa does not go to zero and stay at zero post-op. Read more...

After surviving a radical prostatectomy followed by radiation therapy 6 yrs ago I have had an itchy left breast which has at times been weepy. Psa. 4?

Probably unrelated . Probably unrelated but there may be some gynecomastia and if so this might warrant treatment. Either medical or a short course of radiation should help. I would see a pcp and ask if you need a scan or biopsy to r/o gynecomastic mastitis. Read more...
The common cause. Of 'breast' enlargement, discharge would be hormone management: Bicalutamide is highest. You need an exam. The fact that you have a single > 0.1 psa worries me. Get another. The breast issue is unlikely to be cancer related; however you need an exam, and a diagnosis. Read more...

My dad (age 61) has aggressive stage 4 prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy, and will not get any treatment. How long is he likely to live?

Here are some ... Sorry to hear the sad news of your dad. Who decided not to get any Rx? Your dad or Doc or both? If Doc or both, he would be in the real terminal stage & hard to live longer than 4-6 months; if by himself & still fighting to live on, he may still have some existing strength to live > 6 months. So, ask Doc along the course of his last days of life so he may cope with such to preserve quality dignity. Read more...